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Patient Perspectives

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In "Demystifying Clinical Trials," leukemia survivor, Andrew Schorr blogs about his positive experience participating in a clinical trial. He says while "there are no guarantees of the result'trials are always worth considering'It is through these trials that we determine if new drugs or devices can better serve patients than what is currently available." Though Andrew cites the well-known http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/, which provides information on currently available federally and privately supported clinical trials, he believes we need more disease-specific, user-friendly trial websites.

Leighann Calentine of D-Mom Blog: the Sweet Life with a Diabetic Child, guest blogs this week on Diabetes Mine and offers her five tips for having a safe, fun Halloween with your kids. She stresses "the importance of letting kids be kids.  This is true of birthday celebrations, class parties, and especially holidays like Halloween."

e-Patient Dave @ e-patients.net, blogging from TEDMED, tells the touching story of 26-year-old Charity Tillemann-Dick, who was diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary hypertension and survived a double lung transplant. Charity delivered "a mind-blower" of an opening for the conference in San Diego. He says: "Her story was partially about the medical miracle of her eventual lung transplant'with the extra miracle of her vocal mechanism surviving superbly. But another layer resonated deeply with me: to her it wasn't just about the medicine she wanted to sing'Oh, the joy of being alive and having the life we want."

In "Some Surprises Are Routine", RA Warrior Kelly Young reflects on Jessie Gruman's blog "Patient-Centered Care Should Minimize Post-Surgical Surprises." She wonders if asking your doctor the right questions will help you avoid medical surprises. Before undergoing Radio Frequency Ablation (RFA), Kelly says, "My doctor gave me printouts from good websites about the RFA procedures. I was able to read more online. I even heard online from several other patients who had undergone RFA themselves."  But still, there were surprises.

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