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Health Behavior News Service

The Health Behavior News Service (HBNS), a division of the Center for Advancing Health, brings you the latest health behavior and patient engagement research from selected peer-reviewed journals. HBNS original stories summarize the research findings including '??Key Points'?? and are disseminated for free to the press and the public around the world. These stories were released from 9/11/12-9/18/12.



Risky business'?¦
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that people with a family history of certain diseases, including heart disease and diabetes, often underestimate their risk for developing them, even after completing a risk assessment and receiving personalized prevention messages.'  This surprised lead author Catharine Wang, Ph.D. of the Boston University School of Public Health, who said the findings are important because, "This means that 85 percent didn'??t shift in their perceptions for heart disease even though we told them they'??re at elevated risk because of their family history.'??

Apply directly to the affected area'?¦

People with arthritis who find that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen upset their stomachs have another option: Topical NSAIDs '?? in the form of creams, gels and patches '?? can bring weeks of pain relief for joint pain close to the surface, finds a new review by The Cochrane Library. This is important because, though they are effective, topical NSAIDs have been slow to gain usage in the U.S.'  Roger Chou, M.D., of Oregon Health and Science University, speculates that this is partly because the U.S. Food Administration only approved the first formulations in 2007.

Mom and baby make great roommates'?¦

Another Cochrane review finds that '??rooming in'?? (i.e. keeping mother and her newborn in the same room 24/7) to encourage breastfeeding, does result in more breastfeeding, at least in the short term. Alison Stuebe, M.D., of the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, commented that rooming in should be the norm, although flexibility is needed to individualize care when circumstances require it. '??If a mother is completely exhausted after 40 hours of labor, five hours of pushing, and a C-section, refusing to allow the baby to go to the nursery because hospital policy mandates rooming in may not be in the best interest of mother or baby,'?? Stuebe said.

Is it hot in here?'?¦

Black cohosh, a plant native to North America, has enjoyed widespread popularity as a supplemental treatment for hot flashes.'  However, a new review by The Cochrane Library finds no evidence that the herb is effective. '??I was a little surprised of the outcome of the review given the large number of perimenopausal women that use the herb across the globe for the management of menopausal symptoms, as well as the many manufacturers and therapists that promote the herb for this purpose,'?? said lead reviewer Matthew Leach, Ph.D.

Find more HBNS stories by release date, topic, or sign up to receive our stories weekly. You can also follow HBNS on twitter at @jessiegruman and on Facebook.

 

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The Health Behavior News Service (HBNS), a division of the Center for Advancing Health, brings you the latest health behavior and patient engagement research from selected peer-reviewed journals. HBNS original stories summarize research findings including “Key Points” and are disseminated for free to the press and the public around the world.


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