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The Health Behavior News Service (HBNS), a division of the Center for Advancing Health, brings you the latest health behavior and patient engagement research from selected peer-reviewed journals. HBNS original stories summarize research findings including '??Key Points'?? and are disseminated for free to the press and the public around the world. These stories were released 09/20/12-10/09/12.



Teen sexual health: Rarely prevent unwanted pregnancy & STIs'?¦

A new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health finds that young women who start using hormonal contraceptives for birth control often stop using condoms. Unfortunately, if they later discontinue using hormonal contraceptives, which many women do for a number of reasons, they tend not to resume using condoms, which increases their risk of both unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. The study also found that young women'??s male partners' attitudes toward condoms may be partially to blame. '??It appears that her partner'??s feelings may be more important than her perceived risk of a sexually transmitted infection or her own beliefs about dual method use," said lead researcher Rachel Goldstein.

Hard-hitting anti-smoking ads get to smokers'?¦

Those graphic and emotional anti-smoking ads on TV, like this one depicting a former smoker speaking through her tracheotomy, really do get smokers to try to quit, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. "It surprised me that it would work so well across the board for different types of smokers," said researcher Matthew Farrelly, Ph.D. Graphic, emotional ads may work well because they cut through the noise of other advertising, he noted.

Bad news for our veterans'?¦

Even with access to health care, male military veterans are in poorer health than both men in the National Guard and Reserves and civilian men, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. What'??s more, men in the National Guard and Reserve had higher rates of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Part of this may be explained by the fact that only 37 percent of eligible veterans receive care through the Veterans Affairs system of hospitals, and National Guard/Reserve members were the least likely to receive VA care.

No evidence to back up spinal manipulations'?¦

Manipulating or '??adjusting'?? the spine is a popular way to treat occasional or acute lower back pain and is covered by many health insurance plans. However, a recent review by The Cochrane Library finds no evidence to suggest this therapy is more effective than other therapy options such as exercise, physical therapy, or using NSAID pain medications. Furthermore, the review also found no evidence to suggest that spinal manipulation was more effective than therapies known to be ineffective.

Find more HBNS stories by release date, topic, or sign up to receive our stories weekly. You can also follow HBNS on twitter at @jessiegruman and on Facebook.

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The Health Behavior News Service (HBNS), a division of the Center for Advancing Health, brings you the latest health behavior and patient engagement research from selected peer-reviewed journals. HBNS original stories summarize research findings including “Key Points” and are disseminated for free to the press and the public around the world.


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