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The Other 'F' Word


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I went to see my oncologist for my six-month checkup yesterday. All was routine, other than my blood pressure being 131 over something when it's usually in the 115 range, even when I see my family doctor. No anxiety there.

When he asked what had changed in the last six months, I told him about the endoscopy I had in December, which turned out to be normal. But what prompted it is something anyone who's had cancer faces whether you want to admit it or not (and I usually don't) – fear. I was having stomach discomfort that went beyond what over-the-counter drugs could handle. I finally got worried enough to get in touch with my family doctor. Her practice has a secure portal, so I was able to email her and spew out all my fears.

Ten years ago I wouldn't have shared my fears at all, so that's a kind of progress. But ten years ago I didn't appreciate how your body can turn on you. Thanks to early-stage breast cancer I do, and it's hard for my mind not to immediately go to the worst-case scenario. I shared every cancer scenario that kept me awake at 2 a.m. and scheduled an appointment.

When I came in for the appointment, she was wonderful. I did a brief recap of why I was there. She listened, then said, "Let's put all that stuff you're worried about over here," waving her hand, "and focus on the symptoms." Based on my situation and history she prescribed a stomach acid drug and endoscopy. I want to stress that she didn't order the test because I was scared, and I wouldn't want her to. She ordered it because it was medically indicated. I'm not a big hugger but I asked for a hug after that because her rational but respectful approach was just what I needed. I feel blessed to have her as my doctor.

I feel blessed to have my oncologist too. When I told him about sharing a wheelbarrow full of fears with my family doctor, he nodded and said, "That's what happens when you have cancer." Then he paused and smiled and said, "It doesn't help to be a cancer doctor either." I said no kidding.

It reminded me of the "No Fear" brand of clothing that came into vogue because of motocross. A few years back I spotted a young guy wearing a shirt that said, "Some Fear." I laughed then, but it's even funnier now.

The #BCSM (breast cancer social media) community has discussed this residual fear on their great Monday night tweetchat. If you feel like you could use (or lend) some support and you're comfortable with Twitter, it's a great chat. You can also visit their website. And they're not snobs; some things, like fear, are universal, and people with other kinds of cancer have been made welcome there.

This post originally appeared on Jackie's blog 'Dispatch From Second Base' on February 5, 2014.

More Blog Posts by Jackie Fox

author bio

Jackie Fox is the author of From Zero to Mastectomy: What I Learned and You Need to Know About Stage Zero Breast Cancer, named a Library Journal Best Consumer Health Book in 2010. The book is based on her personal experience with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Fox also blogs at Dispatch From Second Base and is on Twitter as @jackiefox12, where she comments on health issues, poetry, Husker sports and trying to age gracefully.

Tags for this article:
Cancer   Inside Healthcare   Disease Screening   Find Good Health Care   Communicate with your Doctors   Get Preventive Health Care   Women's Health   Lifestyle and Prevention   Mental Health  

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