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Blacks Less Likely to Survive Cancer Than Whites in Large N.J. Study

HBNS STORY | February 2, 2010

Breast Cancer Rates Decline Most for Affluent White Women

HBNS STORY | February 10, 2010

Aggressive Approach to Childhood Cancer Worth Risks, Review Finds

HBNS STORY | May 11, 2010

Exercise Preserves Freedom of Movement After Breast Cancer Surgery

HBNS STORY | June 15, 2010

Unequal Health Care Increases Colorectal Cancer Mortality in Blacks

HBNS STORY | August 19, 2010

Non-hormone Treatments Can Relieve Hot Flashes in Women With Breast Cancer

HBNS STORY | September 7, 2010

Helping Kids Cope With Chemo

HBNS STORY | September 7, 2010

Review Favors Newer Type of Radiation for Prostate Cancer

HBNS STORY | October 27, 2010

Programs Help More Blacks Get Needed Colorectal Cancer Screening

HBNS STORY | October 29, 2010

African-Americans are less likely than whites to be screened for colorectal cancer, and the disparity almost certainly contributes to higher mortality. A new review of studies identifies effective strategies for improving the situation, but suggests that work remains to be done.

Stem Cell Treatment Is Effective for Certain Cases of Acute Leukemia

HBNS STORY | December 9, 2010

Some adults and children with acute leukemia could benefit from certain transplants of blood stem cells, but the benefits are not equal across all cases of leukemia, according to a new review of 15 studies.

Black and Hispanic Women With Breast Cancer Face Treatment Delays

HBNS STORY | February 1, 2011

At a time when access to prompt treatment might affect survival, a large new study finds that African-American and Hispanic women newly diagnosed with breast cancer often face delays in care of more than a month.

Combined Interventions Ease Job Re-Entry for Cancer Survivors

HBNS STORY | February 15, 2011

For cancer survivors who wish to return to work after treatment, a new evidence review suggests that therapies focusing on a wide range of health interventions might best enable them to do so.

Radiation Helps Cure Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, but Future Cancer Risk a Concern

HBNS STORY | February 15, 2011

A systematic review comparing treatments for Hodgkin’s lymphoma found a clear advantage to combined chemotherapy and radiation. However, the review did not address long-term side effects associated with radiation.

African-Americans With Thyroid Cancer Fare Worse Than Whites

HBNS STORY | June 21, 2011

African-Americans have fewer incidences of thyroid cancer but have a more advanced form of the disease once they receive a diagnosis — and are more likely to die from it, according to a new study.

Young Asian/Pacific Islander Women in Calif. Face Higher Breast Cancer Risk

HBNS STORY | June 21, 2011

Young Asian/Pacific Islander women born in California have higher risks of breast cancer than young white women, and some groups, including Filipinas, might have higher risks than African-Americans.

Patient Navigators Might Reduce Disparities in Cancer Care

HBNS STORY | August 16, 2011

Past research shows that minorities suffer higher rates of advanced cancer and deaths from all types of cancer compared to whites. The role of “patient navigator” is emerging as a tool to address these disparities.

Routine Follow-up Mammography Benefits Breast Cancer Survivors

HBNS STORY | September 28, 2011

After breast cancer surgery, a follow-up regimen that includes regular mammograms offers a survival benefit over a follow-up regimen that does not include mammograms, according to a new systematic review.

Breast Cancer Patients More Satisfied When Specialists Share Care Management

HBNS STORY | December 15, 2011

Patients with breast cancer report greater satisfaction when their cancer doctor co-manages care with other specialists, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Three Fears May Discourage Colorectal Cancer Screening

HBNS STORY | April 30, 2012

New research about why people forego colorectal cancer (CRC) screening suggests that three fears play a significant role; fear of embarrassment, fear of getting AIDS and fear of pain may make some seniors skip the potentially lifesaving tests.

Coordinating Cancer Care Remains a Challenge

HBNS STORY | July 11, 2012

People with cancer often receive fragmented and uncoordinated care, as their treatments often require help from multiple clinicians. However, a new review by The Cochrane Library finds no evidence that three main strategies designed to improve coordination of cancer care are effective.

Even With Insurance, Racial Disparities in Breast Cancer Treatment Persist

HBNS STORY | July 26, 2012

A new study in Ethnicity & Disease finds that racial disparities in breast cancer treatment persist even when Black and White patients have the same Medicaid health insurance and similar economic status.

Cancer: Exercise Reduces Tiredness

HBNS STORY | November 15, 2012

Aerobic exercise can help relieve the fatigue often associated with cancer and cancer treatment, according to Cochrane researchers.

Breast Cancer Treatments Delayed for Black and Rural Women

HBNS STORY | May 21, 2013

Black women with breast cancer are more likely than Hispanic or white women to experience delays in the initiation of chemotherapy or radiation after surgery, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Men Say They Want Prostate Cancer Test, Despite Risks

HBNS STORY | July 9, 2013

A survey of men age 40 to 74 found that 54 percent said that they would still opt for a popular prostate cancer screening test despite recent recommendations that the test not be performed, finds a new study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Cancer Survivors Not Receiving Preventive Care

HBNS STORY | August 6, 2013

A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that some cancer survivors do not always have the best access to primary care and that the type of health insurance they have—or don’t have—may be a factor.

Women in Appalachia Have Higher Rates of Late Stage Breast Cancer

HBNS STORY | September 26, 2013

Older women living in the most deprived areas of the U.S. Appalachia had higher rates of late stage breast cancer than women in more affluent areas, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Significant Economic Losses When Young Women Die From Breast Cancer

HBNS STORY | December 12, 2013

In 2008, breast cancer deaths in women under age 50 cost the economy $5.49 billion in productivity and resulted in an estimated 7.98 million years of potential life lost, finds a study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Sedentary Lifestyles Up Mortality Risks for Older Women

HBNS STORY | January 21, 2014

Older women who spend a majority of their day sitting or lying down are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, cancer and death, finds a new study from the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Gap in Life Expectancy Between Rural and Urban Residents Is Growing

HBNS STORY | January 23, 2014

A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that rural residents have experienced smaller gains in life expectancy than their urban counterparts and the gap continues to grow.

Shared Decision Making Missing in Cancer Screening Discussions

HBNS STORY | June 12, 2014

A national survey of patients reveals that physicians don’t always fully discuss the risks and benefits of cancer screening, reports a new study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Lacking Trust in One's Doctor Affects Health of Emotionally Vulnerable Cancer Patients

HBNS STORY | July 22, 2014

The physical and mental well-being of people with cancer may be affected by how they feel about their relationship with their physician and by differences in attachment styles, finds a new study from General Hospital Psychiatry.

Nationality at Birth Plays a Role in U.S. Adult Vaccination Rates

HBNS STORY | October 14, 2014

A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that foreign-born adult U.S. residents, who make up about 13 percent of the population, receive vaccinations at significantly lower rates than U.S.-born adults. This gap in care puts them at greater risk of exposure to several vaccine-preventable diseases.

Fecal Blood Test May Save More Lives Than Colonoscopy

HBNS STORY | October 21, 2014

Colorectal cancer, or CRC, is the second-leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. State public health programs could screen nearly eight times as many individuals and prevent nearly twice as many CRC cases by using fecal immunochemical testing, or FIT, instead of colonoscopies, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Medicaid Payments for Office Visits Impact Cancer Screening Rates

HBNS STORY | November 20, 2014

New research in the journal Cancer finds that Medicaid recipients are more likely to undergo cancer screening tests when their doctors receive higher reimbursements for routine office visits rather than for the tests themselves.

Military Culture Enables Tobacco Use

HBNS STORY | December 4, 2014

A new study in the American Journal of Health Promotion finds that U.S. military culture perpetuates the notion that using tobacco provides stress relief. Previous studies of tobacco use for stress relief among soldiers have produced no evidence supporting the theory.