Content tagged with 'Health Care Access' | back to all topics

Sort by: Show All | HBNS Articles only | Blog Posts only | Resources Only | Features Only
Order by: Newest First | Oldest First

We Don't Ration Health Care in America. Or Do We?

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | October 29, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman

As narrower insurance networks begin to limit where we can get our care and contradict the American notion of abundant choices, I thought about the Canadian health care system and rumors of its long waiting lists that grab U.S. headlines. Yet, narrow insurance networks, sky-high deductibles, co-insurance and co-pays are ways of controlling our medical expenditures. Instead of rationing with waiting lists, America rations with price...

How Differently Patients and Doctors View Health Technology, With Dr. Eric Topol

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | October 20, 2014 | Jane Sarasohn Kahn

Ninety-one percent of doctors are concerned about giving patients access to their detailed electronic health records, anticipating patients will feel anxious about the results. Only 34 percent of consumers are concerned about anxiety-due-to-EHR-exposure. Welcome to the digital health chasm, the gap between what consumers want out of digital health and what doctors believe patients can handle...

'I No Longer Have to Go to See the Doctor': How the Patient Portal is Changing Medical Practice

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | September 2, 2014 | Charlie Smith

Not long ago, the only options my patients had for communicating with me were to come in to the office or relay a message through the office staff. But since recently introducing the patient portal in our electronic medical record, my practice has changed substantially for the better...

What Community Health Leaders Told CFAH About Patient Engagement

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | July 23, 2014 | CFAH Staff

"When I think of patient engagement, I think of a partnership where people work together to figure out what the patient wants and how to support the process. Engagement is the knowledge base, working through the decisions and helping people to become full partners in their health outcomes." – June Simmons, MSW — Founding President and CEO, Partners in Care Foundation, San Fernando, CA

Stop the War on the Emergency Room (Fix the System Failure)

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | July 8, 2014 | Nick Dawson

The ED is convenient, it's open 24 hours, it does not require an appointment. So when the stomach bug or kitchen accident gets the best of you at 9:00 pm, and your doctor's office is closed, where are you going to go? And, yet, we still chide people – via reporting, casual comments and the communication of health systems – for using the ED for "non-emergent" needs. What I'd like to see is more hospitals flinging open the doors of their EDs and saying, "We'll take you, any time, for any reason, and you won't wait long or pay an arm and a leg"...

Entitlement: The Overlooked Dimension of Patient Engagement

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | June 4, 2014 | Jessie Gruman

What does it means to be an "engaged" patient in the VA system today? It seems you have to know a senator who will intervene on your behalf, to give your health care a priority higher than his other constituents. This is deeply discomforting, and I hate that I am treated in a health care system where even those who are most accountable for the quality of the care it provides (the institutional leaders) can't trust the institution or the professionals who work there to routinely and uniformly deliver excellent care...

Who Needs a Doctor These Days?

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | May 6, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman

Are insurance companies making more decisions about the health care you receive? I received a letter from Aetna, my Medicare supplement insurance carrier, advertising a pitch for getting "started on a healthier lifestyle." "Because of your health history, we think you might benefit from joining our program," the letter read. Annoyed, I called the insurer...

Co-Insurance for Medications: A Troubling Trend for Consumers

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | April 14, 2014 | Ali Khoshnevis

As the health care system changes in the coming years, one particular trend that will negatively impact consumers' out-of-pocket costs is the use of co-insurance (instead of a co-pay) for expensive specialty medications. Approximately 57 million Americans rely on these drugs to maintain their health, and it is disheartening to learn that many people are suffering because their medications have become too expensive...

The Medicaid Gap Hits Home

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | April 8, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman

A few days before the recent deadline for Obamacare sign-ups, I visited with one of the exchange navigators in Colorado, a state that expanded its Medicaid program and is working hard to enroll uninsured residents. This visit got me thinking of the millions of other people who live in states where they can't get access to Obamacare because they are too poor and yet are also not eligible for Medicaid...

Working With Your Doctor's Office

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | April 2, 2014 | Jessie Gruman

It is common for those who work in and deliver health care to overestimate our knowledge about our bodies, our illnesses and how the health care system works. Such as: Who is the nurse practitioner? Where is Dr. X's office? When is "soon"? Why are you recommending this test? To help people find good health care and make the most of it, the following video explains two key things to ask when making your appointment and three questions to get answered before you leave your doctor's office...

Costs Complicated Dad's Cancer Care

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | March 31, 2014 | Laura Sander

"I walked in a person, and out a cancer patient," my dad said as we filed home. Crossing this threshold, we found ourselves on the other side of medicine – the side on the exam table or gurney, as opposed to the one standing over it. In time, it became clear we were running out of money...

The Dilemma of Canceled Insurance Policies

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | March 18, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman

By now it's hardly a secret that insurance companies have canceled the policies of millions of Americans whose old coverage did not comply with new benefit requirements of the Affordable Care Act. But after hearing all the backlash and requiring people to buy newer and, in the eyes of ACA supporters, better policies, the administration took another U-turn and changed the rules once again...

Look Who's Coming Between You and Your Doctor

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | March 11, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman

Opponents of health care reform, especially those who resist moving to a single payer system like Canada’s, have often used a very powerful argument to sway public opinion. Any significant changes, they warn, to America's private insurance system would mean that the government will come between patients and their doctors by making decisions about the care Americans receive. But what if it's not the government that is inserting itself between you and your doctor?

What Is Patient-Centered Medicine, Really?

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | March 10, 2014 | Barbara Kivowitz

We have all heard the term patient-centered medicine by now. It's in the PR materials for hospitals, in the Affordable Care Act, in health care model innovations like the "medical home" and the "accountable care organization." But what is it? What would you like to see in a health system that is truly patient-centered?

Obamacare Websites: Not Just a .Gov Problem

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | March 4, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman

Shoppers searching the Internet for health insurance coverage can be forgiven if they are confused.

'Me' Versus 'We' in Obamacare

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | February 25, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman

The Obama administration and Affordable Care Act supporters have not bothered to explain how the law includes cross-subsidization, missing an opportunity to talk about the "we" aspects of the law. As one 58-year-old woman put it: "The chances of me having a child at this age is zero. Why do I have to pay an additional $5,000 a year for coverage that I will never, ever need?" Here's how it works...

Normal Care Hours Don't Work for Workers With Chronic Conditions

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | February 12, 2014 | Jessie Gruman

It looks like an airport lounge without the rolling suitcases. There are about 20 of us fiddling with our phones or reading the newspaper, waiting to meet with our doctor for follow-up or monitoring visits. All of us are between the ages of 20 and 70 and all of us are dressed for success – or at least for our jobs. What's wrong with this picture? Why are employed adults spending a busy Wednesday morning waiting (and waiting) for our health care appointment when we should be working?

N=1: My Experience With Cost, Care and Insurance

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | February 3, 2014 | Robert Fogerty

During my senior year in college, with medical school acceptance letter in hand, I was diagnosed with metastatic testicular cancer. Early in my treatment I received a letter that my health insurance had been exhausted and I would no longer receive any health benefits. Needless to say, this was a problem...

Welcome Shifts in Primary Care

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | January 23, 2014 | CFAH Staff

What exactly is primary care? There have been a number of news stories lately that point to shifts in its traditional definitions and in what patients can (or should) expect to receive from primary care providers...

Why Does Our Health Care Cost So Much?

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | January 8, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman

We know that the U.S. has the most expensive health care in the world. But beyond noting that dubious achievement, we seldom ask why...

Lack of Access Still to Blame

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | January 7, 2014 | CFAH Staff

What's the key to reducing costly emergency room visits and readmissions? People who lack convenient access to a health care provider, with or without insurance, return to the emergency department or hospital out of need and desperation...

Advice for People New to Health Insurance (Part 7): Get the Most Out of Your Appointment

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | January 1, 2014 | Be a Prepared Patient

In part seven of our series, we offer advice about how to make the most of your doctor's appointment. Here's what you should do before, during and after your visit...

Advice for People New to Health Insurance (Part 6): 10 Steps to Making a Doctor's Appointment

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | December 31, 2013 | Be a Prepared Patient

In part six of our series, you'll find out what key pieces of information you need to know about your new doctor's office. Keep it handy with your personal health records or household files...

Advice for People New to Health Insurance (Part 2): Medicare and Medicaid Explained

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | December 24, 2013 | CFAH Staff

In part two of our series, we look at the difference between Medicare and Medicaid. Our 'Be a Prepared Patient' resources can help you figure out if you qualify for either of these or other special health care programs...

Advice for People New to Health Insurance (Part 1): Getting Covered

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | December 23, 2013 | CFAH Staff

In part one of our series, we look at the basics of picking a health insurance plan that's right for you, your family or a loved one. Our 'Be a Prepared Patient' resources can help you find the best coverage at the best price for your health needs...

Is Shopping for an Exchange Policy an Impossible Task?

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | December 18, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman

Last week at a New York City meeting of the Association of Health Care Journalists, Elisabeth Benjamin, a vice president of the Community Service Society, tried to explain the New York health insurance exchange to a group of skeptical journalists who had more than a passing familiarity with the topic...

The Great Canadian Experiment to House the Homeless

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | November 13, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman

At Home/Chez Soi, a Canadian program for the mentally ill, is built on the concept that providing housing is the first order of business. An approach that reinforces the truism that good health is more than swallowing the latest wonder drug.

We Are the New (Free) Health Care Workforce

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | November 6, 2013 | Jessie Gruman

Outsourcing work to cheaper workers is a common strategy of corporations. It has largely escaped the public’s notice, however, that much of this new labor force isn't located in Southeast Asia, but is rather found here in the U.S. and is virtually free. It is us...

Latest Health Behavior News

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | October 11, 2013 | Health Behavior News Service

In this week's health news: Patient-doctor relationship affects diabetes care | Women in Appalachia at risk for late stage breast cancer | People with asthma need not fear exercise | Treating depression helps some smokers quit...

Low Premiums, Narrow Networks and the Ideal of Consumer Choice

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | September 18, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman

We want to have choices about the health care we get and who provides it. Many of us think we have that now...

Googling for Doctors and Health Information

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | August 6, 2013 | Conversation Continues

Many people rely on the internet to look up health information or find a new doctor. However, navigating through the vast amount of resources and information online can be exhausting. Doctors Kevin Pho and Kenny Lin share some tips.

Semper Paratus: Our Decisions About Emergency Care

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | June 12, 2013 | Jessie Gruman

Sometimes it is clear that the only response to a health crisis is to call 911 and head for the emergency department. But so many times the course of action is less obvious while the demand for some action is urgent.

Fire My Doctor? Not So Fast

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | June 5, 2013 | Jessie Gruman

Last week, a friend told me that her mother had been fired as a patient by her primary care physician in a letter she received in the mail. Last week, I fired my oncologist by email. My friend and I both wrestled with accepting that, in fact, this relationship needed to end.

Six Awkward Concerns in My OpenNotes

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | March 25, 2013 | Leslie Kernisan

I find myself relieved that I don’t have to figure out how to document (or not document?) concerns [in patient records]...Wondering what they are? Ok, I will tell you, but shhh...don’t tell my elderly patients that I may be considering these topics as I care for them.

What Do We Need Doctors For?

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | March 21, 2013 | Elaine Schattner

Should nurse prac­ti­tioners, RNs, physician assis­tants, phar­ma­cists, social workers and others including, yes, peer patients, take up much — or even most, of doctors’ tasks?

The Team Will See You Now...What Team?

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | February 27, 2013 | Jessie Gruman

Have you heard that soon most primary care in the US will be delivered by teams? Yep. Team-based care is one of the characteristics of the patient-centered medical home, a way of organizing the care of patients that allows primary care clinicians to see more patients in a day while at the same time delivering better care.

How to Find a (Good) Doctor

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | June 22, 2012 | Conversation Continues

While the benefits of having (and keeping) a good physician may be evident, how do you find this just-right-for-you clinician?

Why Can I Only Get Health Care from 9 to 5, M thru F?

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | March 28, 2012 | Jessie Gruman

Last week, the waiting room of the out-patient cancer clinic looked like an airport lounge without the rolling suitcases. There were about 20 of us cancer survivor-types talking on our smartphones, fiddling with our iPads, reading The New York Times...What's wrong with this picture?

How to Choose a Doctor

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | March 23, 2012 | Harriet Hall

I get a lot of inquiries about how to find a good doctor. I don't have a good answer. I thought it might be useful to throw out some ideas that have occurred to me and hope that readers will have better ideas and will share their experiences about what has or hasn't worked.

Hospital Games: Luring Patients to the ER

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | March 6, 2012 | Trudy Lieberman

You may have seen the billboards or gotten a message on your smartphone: Come to our emergency room; our waits are short.

Opening Up the Doctor's Notebook

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | January 13, 2012 | Anne Polta

If you could see what your doctor wrote about you in your medical record, would this hurt or enhance your relationship? A new survey found that the majority of patients more than 90 percent are supportive and even enthusiastic about being able to read the doctor's notes. But among physicians, the reaction was mixed.

Who Accesses Health Care, and How?

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | December 19, 2011 | Inside Health Care

All kinds of people seek out health care, but studies show that not everyone accesses and receives care in the same way. Here, health care insiders look at how access varies among women, children and those with disabilities.

1st Person: Are Doctor Ratings Sites Useful?

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | November 15, 2011 | First Person

When it came time for Jennifer Stevens, an Omaha, Nebraska resident and mother of two, to find an obstetrician for her first baby, she was faced with a dilemma.

Prepared Patient: Using Physician Rating Websites

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | November 15, 2011 | Health Behavior News Service

User reviews and ratings on websites can help you locate a reputable handyman, the perfect restaurant for your anniversary dinner or the right TV for your den. So why wouldn't you turn to the Internet to find your next doctor? New health review sites promise to help you make this important decision for yourself or your loved ones. However, patients and physicians alike are finding that these doctor reviews aren't as transparent or useful as they might seem.

Take a Number

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | November 8, 2011 | Inside Health Care

Nobody likes to wait. And patients and doctors alike are frustrated by the general waiting that seems to be an inevitable part of delivering and receiving care. Here, Art Markman, Lisa Gualtieri, and anonymous patient blogger WarmSocks share their views.

Drop-kicked into a Foreign Country

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | October 26, 2011 | Jessie Gruman

We patients are always tourists in the world of health care. Whether we are coming to our doctor's office to rule out a strep infection, a clinic for a bi-monthly diabetes check-in, or a hospital for surgery, we don't work here.

Guest Blog: Instant Access & Old Faulty Assumptions

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | October 25, 2011 | Rima Rudd

The current literature indicates that we in the various health disciplines provide texts that are poorly written and organized, web sites that are hard to navigate, as well as charts and graphs that are difficult for many to interpret and use. I say that we can make information truly accessible and usable by adding needed rigor to our work.

1st Person: Acute Pain: Sudden Impact

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | September 22, 2011 | First Person

Dr. Jan Adams has had more than her share of painful experiences. A retired general practitioner and mother of two who practiced 'womb-to-tomb' medicine, she conducted humanitarian work around the world, notably with medical clown Patch Adams (no relation).

Prepared Patient: Getting the Right Help for Acute Pain

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | September 22, 2011 | Health Behavior News Service

Whether caused by injury, surgery or a toothache so bad it slams you awake in the middle of the night, acute pain is difficult. Receiving prompt and helpful treatment can make all the difference in the world. But lack of care or inadequate care means that the acute pain may develop into chronic agony.

Using Health IT to Address Healthcare Disparities

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | September 8, 2011 | Chris Gibbons

With almost a decade's worth of the National Healthcare Disparities Reports behind us, it is clear that addressing disparities defies simplistic solutions. As we all believe that the complexity of cancer, cardiovascular diseases and HIV/AIDS will not stop us from one day finding a cure, I firmly believe that this same tenacity of spirit is needed to successfully surmount the challenges of disparities.

Middle-of-the-Night Medicine is Rarely Patient-Centred

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | August 31, 2011 | Jessie Gruman

Here's is my recent interview for 'Middle-of-the-Night Medicine is Rarely Patient-Centred' by Erin Walkinshaw, a report in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ) on the subpar level of health care provided in hospitals on weekends or evenings.

Guest Blog: Recovery and Healing

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | August 29, 2011 | Katherine Ellington

Medical student Katherine Ellington grapples with reconciling her two roles as daughter and doctor-in-training as her mother recovers from a heart procedure.

Matters of the Heart

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | August 22, 2011 | Katherine Ellington

When her mom is being treated for a newly diagnosed heart condition, medical student Katherine Ellington learns first-hand how her medical training applies to real life. This is the second in a series of three posts.

Taking a Closer Look at Chronic Pain

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | August 11, 2011 | Conversation Continues

This June, an Institute of Medicine report estimated that chronic pain affects 116 million Americans. Here, Tara Parker-Pope, Maia Szalavitz, and Elizabeth Cohen offer their perspectives on the findings. Kelly Young, RAWarrior, adds her personal experience, too.

Patient Navigators: Are They Necessary or Just Nice?

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | May 4, 2011 | Jessie Gruman

Each of the four times I have received a cancer-related diagnosis, I felt like I had been drop-kicked into a foreign country: I didn't know the language, I didn't understand the culture, I didn't have a map and I desperately wanted to find my way home.Over the years I have listened to hundreds of people describe the same experience following the diagnosis of a serious illness. As the number of physicians, diagnostic test sites and treatment options have grown and the lack of seamless, coordinated care persists, the majority of patients and their loved ones struggle to find the right care and make good use of it.

What Can Health Care Professionals Do About Poverty?

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | October 20, 2010 | Connie Davis

A colleague of mine, Cheryl, has been trying to help a solo physician address a thorny issue. Through the use of 'How's Your Health', an amazing Web-based suite of health and practice tools, the physician realized that many of her patients struggled with maintaining an adequate income. Cheryl went looking for some ideas for the physician, and she came across this: Health Providers Against Poverty, an Ontario-based group that has a toolkit to help primary care professionals address poverty issues.

Direct-to-Consumer Health Care

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | October 19, 2010 | Chris Gibbons

On October 11, 2010, Baltimore Sun reporter Meredith Cohn reported that some U.S. health care providers are experimenting with trying to reach patients through social media and reaping big rewards. Providers are not just using Twitter and Facebook but trying new social media tools like Groupon, Foursquare, Scoutmob and LivingSocial that all blend social media with market forces to bring customers value and create new revenue for entrepreneurs, business owners and now health care providers.

I Want a Real Medical Home...Not a Dream

PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | April 15, 2010 | Dorothy Jeffress

When I first learned of the primary care medical home model it seemed to offer a great solution to medical homelessness a sort of permanent doctor-patient renter status, where both parties are bouncing around without a foundation, without a community and where a certain uncertainty exists and miscommunications and disorganization prevail.