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Prescription Costs More Likely to Deter Hispanics in Study

HBNS STORY | May 10, 2010

Out-of-Pocket Costs Put Arthritis Drugs Out of Reach for Some

HBNS STORY | May 20, 2010

Prescription Restrictions Cut Costs, But How Does Health Fare?

HBNS STORY | August 17, 2010

More People Get Health Screenings When Deductibles Are Waived

HBNS STORY | October 15, 2010

More Americans Turn to Lower-Cost Alternative Meds, Especially Whites

HBNS STORY | February 1, 2011

Taking Diabetes Medication Helps Lower Medical Costs, Slightly

HBNS STORY | March 18, 2011

A new study shows that diabetes patients who do a better job of taking their medication have slightly lower health care costs.

When Doctors Own or Lease MRI, Back Scans and Surgery More Likely

HBNS STORY | April 26, 2011

When doctors can self-refer for MRI, patients are more apt to receive scans – and even surgery – for low back pain.

Serious Distress Linked to Higher Health Care Spending

HBNS STORY | May 12, 2011

Sufferers of serious psychological distress spend an average of $1,735 more on health care each year compared to those without the condition.

Health Insurance Doesn’t Always Protect People From Medical Debt

HBNS STORY | June 30, 2011

A new study confirms that having health insurance coverage is no guarantee against accumulating medical debt for working-age adults.

Even Small Increases in Copays Affect Use of Children's Healthcare

HBNS STORY | February 17, 2012

Increases in copayments of only a few dollars for ALL Kids, Alabama's Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), led to declines in the use of several healthcare services for the children they affected, reveals a study in Health Services Research.

Employee Wellness Programs Provide Significant Savings Over Time

HBNS STORY | March 6, 2012

Employees who participated in a health-improvement program had fewer medical costs than non-participants, according to a new report in the American Journal of Health Promotion. In addition, three year employer savings outpaced the program costs with a return on investment of almost $3 to $1.

Doctors Who Share Patients May Provide Lower Cost Care

HBNS STORY | July 31, 2012

Patients with diabetes or congestive heart failure who receive care from doctors with high levels of patient overlap have lower total health care costs and lower rates of hospitalization, according to a new study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

People with Few Assets Less Likely to Plan for End-of-Life Health Care

HBNS STORY | August 16, 2012

Socioeconomic status is a big predictor of how likely people are to have living wills, a power of attorney for health care decisions or to participate in informal discussions about treatment preferences with loved ones. People with few assets were half as likely as those of more means to plan for these end-of-life concerns, a new study in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior finds.

Rising Cost of Inpatient Care Linked to Medical Devices and Supplies

HBNS STORY | August 29, 2012

Inpatient hospital treatment accounts for the largest proportion of health care spending in the U.S., with the use of diagnostic imaging services such as MRIs, frequently implicated as the probable cause. A new analysis in Health Services Research finds that the biggest expense may not be imaging technology but from supplies including medical devices, such as stents and artificial joints.

Unwilling to Pay Extra for Wellness

HBNS STORY | April 9, 2013

Although most overweight adults agree that health insurance benefits designed to promote weight loss are a good idea, they don’t want to pay extra for them, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Alcohol and Mental Health Problems a Costly Combo for ICU Patients

HBNS STORY | April 16, 2013

People admitted to a hospital ICU with alcohol withdrawal were more likely to be readmitted or die within a year if they had a co-existing mental health condition, finds a new study in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

Smoke-Free Public Housing Would = Better Health and Savings

HBNS STORY | April 16, 2013

Establishing smoke-free policies for public housing would help protect residents, visitors and employees from the harmful effects of smoking and result in significant cost savings, reports a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Credit Card Debt Leads Some to Skip Medical Care

HBNS STORY | April 25, 2013

People with outstanding credit card or medical debt were more likely to delay or avoid medical or dental care, finds a new study in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Unemployment Linked to Reduced Use of Preventive Health Care

HBNS STORY | July 23, 2013

Fluctuations in the unemployment rate affect people’s health care choices, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

High Lifetime Costs for Type 2 Diabetes

HBNS STORY | August 8, 2013

A person with type 2 diabetes spends on average more than $85,000 treating the disease and its complications over their lifetime, according to a recent study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Cuts to Local Health Departments Hurt Communities

HBNS STORY | November 14, 2013

A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that many local health departments aren’t able to meet goals to increase health care access.

More Funding for Community Health Centers Improves Access to Care

HBNS STORY | January 2, 2014

Increased federal funding for community health centers has helped low-income adults get access to primary and dental care, according to a new study in Health Services Research.

Hospitals Serving Elderly Poor More Likely to Be Penalized for Readmissions

HBNS STORY | January 7, 2014

Hospitals that treat more poor seniors who are on both Medicaid and Medicare tend to have higher rates of readmissions, triggering costly penalties, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Patients Are Loyal to Their Doctors, Despite Performance Scores

HBNS STORY | March 11, 2014

Patients with an existing relationship with a doctor ranked as lower performing were no more likely to switch doctors than patients with higher performing doctors, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Cost of Health Care a Burden for Most U.S. Households

HBNS STORY | March 13, 2014

Since 2001, health care costs have become more burdensome for almost all Americans, at every income level and in every geographic area, finds a new study published in The Milbank Quarterly.

Community Demographics Linked to Hospital Readmissions

HBNS STORY | April 10, 2014

Nearly 60 percent of the variation in hospital readmission rates appears to be associated with a hospital’s geographic location, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Blacks with Financial Worries Have Lower Health Scores

HBNS STORY | April 15, 2014

Black adults who reported feeling more financial strain also rated their health more poorly than those with less financial strain, finds a new study in the American Journal of Health Behavior.

Misunderstanding Health Insurance Leads Some to Overspend

HBNS STORY | May 1, 2014

Uninsured adults who didn't understand health insurance tended to have trouble selecting plans that aligned with their stated needs and spent more money, finds a study in Health Services Research.

Obese Employees Cost Employers Thousands in Extra Medical Costs

HBNS STORY | May 13, 2014

A new study in the American Journal of Health Promotion finds that, on average, a morbidly obese employee costs an employer over $4,000 more per year in health care and related costs than an employee who is of normal weight.

Class and Insurance Stigma Are Barriers to Good Health Care

HBNS STORY | June 19, 2014

Some low-income, uninsured and Medicaid patients report feeling stigma when interacting with health care providers, finds a new report in The Milbank Quarterly.

Early Palliative Care Cuts Costs for Critically Ill Patients

HBNS STORY | July 10, 2014

Palliative care delivered early during hospitalization can help cut costs for critically ill patients, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Cervical Cancer Prevention Program Saves Lives

HBNS STORY | July 15, 2014

A federal screening program markedly reduced death and illness from cervical cancer in underserved, low-income women but reached just 10 percent of the likely eligible population, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Patient-Centered Medical Homes Reduce Costs

HBNS STORY | July 31, 2014

As the number of patient centered medical homes has increased, a new report in the journal Health Services Research finds the model offers a promising option to reduce health care costs and utilization of some health care services.

Medicare Changes Lower Hospital Use

HBNS STORY | August 5, 2014

A recent study in Health Services Research based on 15 years of hospital data suggests that cuts in Medicare prices under the Affordable Care Act may slow the growth in overall hospital spending.

Self-Reported Health Information Predicts High-Need Medicaid Patients

HBNS STORY | August 19, 2014

Just three types of simple self-reported health measures can predict which Medicaid-eligible adults are more likely to access intensive and costly health services over the next year, a new study in Health Services Research suggests.

Poor Health Habits Linked to Financial Insecurity

HBNS STORY | September 4, 2014

Financial hardship, or feeling that one can’t make ends meet, may be more predictive of health risk behaviors than actual income levels for people with low-incomes, finds a recent study in the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Expanding Medicaid Increases Rural Health Care Access and Use

HBNS STORY | October 2, 2014

A new study in Health Services Research reveals that expanding Medicaid to cover more adults boosts health care access and use in rural populations.

Fecal Blood Test May Save More Lives Than Colonoscopy

HBNS STORY | October 21, 2014

Colorectal cancer, or CRC, is the second-leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. State public health programs could screen nearly eight times as many individuals and prevent nearly twice as many CRC cases by using fecal immunochemical testing, or FIT, instead of colonoscopies, finds a new study in Health Services Research.