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Depression and Dementia in Older Adults Increase Risk of Preventable Hospitalizations

HBNS STORY | November 20, 2014

Older adults with mental health conditions, such as depression or cognitive impairment, have a higher risk of readmission within 30 days after a hospital stay for pneumonia, heart attack or congestive heart failure, according to a new study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Chronic Care Coordinators Improve Diabetes Monitoring But Not Blood Sugar Control

HBNS STORY | November 11, 2014

Getting support from a chronic care coordinator increases blood-glucose testing and foot and eye exams in people with type 2 diabetes, but it may not improve blood-sugar control, a new study in the journal Health Services Research indicates.

Teens World-Wide Self-Medicate With Over-the-Counter and Prescription Drugs

HBNS STORY | September 23, 2014

Adolescents around the world are frequently using over-the-counter and prescription medications without a doctor’s order, a risky practice that can lead to overuse and abuse and is often continued into adulthood, reveals a new review in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Elderly Who Have Had Serious Falls May Show Symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress

HBNS STORY | September 11, 2014

Older adults who experience a serious fall may develop symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the days following the event, finds a study published in General Hospital Psychiatry.

Counseling Has Limited Benefit on Young People Drinking Alcohol

HBNS STORY | August 21, 2014

Counseling techniques used to help young people with drinking problems may be of limited benefit, suggests a new review in The Cochrane Library.

Mental Health Screening in Primary Care Helps Veterans

HBNS STORY | August 12, 2014

Veterans who receive mental health screening during primary care visits are generally getting adequate follow-up treatment, but the process for acquiring care could be improved, finds a new study in General Hospital Psychiatry.

Family History of Undertreatment May Discourage Blacks from Seeking Mental Health Care

HBNS STORY | August 7, 2014

Blacks with a family history of untreated mental health disorders are less likely to seek treatment, even when they rate their own mental health as poor, finds a new study in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Inadequate Mental Health Care for Blacks with Depression and Diabetes, High Blood Pressure

HBNS STORY | July 24, 2014

A new study in General Hospital Psychiatry confirms that Blacks with depression plus another chronic medical condition, such as Type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure, do not receive adequate mental health treatment.

Lacking Trust in One's Doctor Affects Health of Emotionally Vulnerable Cancer Patients

HBNS STORY | July 22, 2014

The physical and mental well-being of people with cancer may be affected by how they feel about their relationship with their physician and by differences in attachment styles, finds a new study from General Hospital Psychiatry.

When It Comes to Health Disparities, Place Matters More Than Race

HBNS STORY | July 17, 2014

Blacks and Whites living in an integrated, low-income urban area had similar rates of treatment and management of hypertension, or high blood pressure, finds a new study in Ethnicity & Disease.

More Patient Education, Not Physician Training, Helps Control Diabetes

HBNS STORY | May 8, 2014

Teaching people with diabetes how to control their blood glucose levels, not their doctors, helps them achieve better results, finds a new study in Ethnicity and Disease.

A Phone Call from a Pharmacist Can Reduce Some Hospital Admissions

HBNS STORY | April 10, 2014

Pharmacist-patient telephone consultations appear to reduce hospitalizations in patients who are least at risk, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Weight Loss Efforts Start Well, but Lapse Over Time

HBNS STORY | April 8, 2014

Learning you have an obesity-related disease motivates many to start a weight loss program, but troubling health news is often not enough to sustain weight loss efforts, finds new research in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Hospitalization Increases Risk of Depression and Dementia for Seniors

HBNS STORY | February 27, 2014

People over age 65 who have been hospitalized are at significantly greater risk for dementia or depression, finds a new study in General Hospital Psychiatry.

Men, Elderly, Minorities Not Getting Treated for Depression

HBNS STORY | February 6, 2014

Depression rates are increasing in the U.S. and under-treatment is widespread, especially among certain groups including men, the poor, the elderly and ethnic minorities, finds a new study in General Hospital Psychiatry.

Pre-Surgical Drug May Ease Recovery and Reduce Pain for Kids

HBNS STORY | January 30, 2014

A new evidence review from The Cochrane Library found that administering a drug called clonidine before surgery may be a good alternative for controlling post-surgical pain and help reduce a child’s anxiety after surgery.

Significant Economic Losses When Young Women Die From Breast Cancer

HBNS STORY | December 12, 2013

In 2008, breast cancer deaths in women under age 50 cost the economy $5.49 billion in productivity and resulted in an estimated 7.98 million years of potential life lost, finds a study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Many Patients Have Trouble ID’ing Their Medications

HBNS STORY | December 3, 2013

People who identified their medication by shape, size or color instead of name had poorer adherence and an increased risk of hospitalization, finds a recent study in the Journal of Health Communication: International Perspectives.

Smartphone Apps to Help Smokers Quit Come Up Short

HBNS STORY | November 14, 2013

Most popular smartphone apps do not include evidence-based practices known to help smokers quit, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Chronic Pain and Emotional Distress Often Treated With Risky Medications

HBNS STORY | November 12, 2013

People with chronic pain and emotional distress are more likely to be given ongoing prescriptions for opioid drugs, which may not help, finds a new review in General Hospital Psychiatry.

Teen Athletes at Risk for Medication Misuse

HBNS STORY | November 10, 2013

Male adolescents who participate in organized sports are more likely to be prescribed opioid medications and misuse them than male teens that don’t play sports, finds a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Banning Workplace Smoking Not Enough

HBNS STORY | October 31, 2013

Failing to address the presence of other smokers at home limits the effectiveness of workplace smoking restrictions, finds a new study in American Journal of Health Promotion.

Teens with Chronic Illnesses Find It Hard to Stick to Treatment

HBNS STORY | October 29, 2013

Teens with a variety of chronic illnesses report facing similar barriers to taking their medications, according to a new review in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Exercise Benefits People with Asthma

HBNS STORY | September 24, 2013

People with asthma who engaged in appropriate exercise programs had improved cardiovascular fitness and an overall improved quality of life, finds a new review in The Cochrane Library.

Treating Depression Helps Some Smokers Quit

HBNS STORY | September 19, 2013

Adding mood management strategies to smoking cessation programs helped people with depression or a history of depression quit smoking for longer periods than a standard program, finds a new review in The Cochrane Library

Bedwetting Treatments Offer Help

HBNS STORY | August 20, 2013

Simple treatments for bed-wetting are better than nothing at all, but aren’t as effective as more advanced alarm therapy or drug therapy, according to a new meta-analysis in The Cochrane Library.

Rural Seniors Prefer Self-Care Over Doctors

HBNS STORY | August 15, 2013

A survey of older rural adults found a high degree of medical skepticism, the belief that one knows and can control their own health better than a medical professional can, reports a recent study in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved.

Later Cord Clamping After Birth Increases Iron Levels in Babies

HBNS STORY | July 11, 2013

Delaying clamping of the umbilical cord after birth benefits newborn babies, according to a systematic review published in The Cochrane Library.

Lower Coronary Heart Disease Deaths By Making Several Lifestyle Changes

HBNS STORY | July 9, 2013

Programs to address multiple health behaviors, such as diet and exercise, significantly lowered the risk of a fatal heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular event in people with coronary heart disease, finds a new review in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Hispanic and Black Kids Less Likely to Use Medication to Control Asthma

HBNS STORY | June 27, 2013

Black and Hispanic children with asthma are less likely than White children to use long-term asthma control medications, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Quitting Smoking: Licensed Medications Are Effective

HBNS STORY | June 6, 2013

Nicotine replacement therapy and other licensed drugs can help people quit smoking, according to a new systematic review published in The Cochrane Library.

Probiotics Prevent Diarrhea Related To Antibiotic Use

HBNS STORY | June 6, 2013

Probiotic supplements have the potential to prevent diarrhea caused by antibiotics, according to a new review in The Cochrane Library.

Teaching Patients about New Medications? A Picture Is Worth 1000 Words

HBNS STORY | April 30, 2013

Improving people’s knowledge and skills about their medications may be best achieved with multimedia patient education materials, finds a new systematic review in The Cochrane Library.

Alcohol and Mental Health Problems a Costly Combo for ICU Patients

HBNS STORY | April 16, 2013

People admitted to a hospital ICU with alcohol withdrawal were more likely to be readmitted or die within a year if they had a co-existing mental health condition, finds a new study in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

Diabetes: Computer Based Interventions Provide Limited Support

HBNS STORY | March 28, 2013

Self-management interventions delivered by computer and mobile phone currently provide limited benefits for people with diabetes, according to a systematic review published in The Cochrane Library.

Diabetes + Depression = Increased Risk of Death

HBNS STORY | February 13, 2013

People living with diabetes who also have untreated depression are at increased risk of death, according to a recent evidence review in General Hospital Psychiatry.

Early Intervention for Premature Infants Increases IQ

HBNS STORY | December 20, 2012

Programs aimed at helping premature infants and their families once they leave the hospital have been found to increase IQ in the period up to school age and improve cognitive skills, finds a new review in The Cochrane Library.

Most People with Hepatitis C Go Untreated, Despite Effective Drugs

HBNS STORY | December 10, 2012

Just 20 percent of people infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) begin the recommended treatment regimen and less than 5 percent go on to successfully overcome the virus, according to a new review in General Hospital Psychiatry. Untreated substance abuse and depression are among the barriers to care.

Patients with ICU Delirium More Likely to Die

HBNS STORY | December 6, 2012

Delirium, a condition developed by many patients in hospital intensive care units (ICU), is associated with higher mortality rates, more complications, longer stays in the ICU, and longer hospitalizations, finds a new meta-analysis in General Hospital Psychiatry.

Treatment for Minority Stroke Patients Improves at Top-ranked Hospitals

HBNS STORY | June 21, 2011

A new study suggests there has been some improvement in reducing the gap in stroke hospitalization between white and minority patients.

Researchers Still Searching for Ways to Help Patients Take Their Meds

HBNS STORY | May 12, 2011

Clinicians have tried a variety of ways to encourage people to take prescribed medicines, but a new research review says it is still unclear whether many of these interventions have been effective.

Doctor’s Office Is Usually First Stop in Medication Mishaps

HBNS STORY | May 6, 2011

Medication mishaps are a widely recognized problem in health care and a new study finds that ambulatory care settings, not ERs, deal with them most.

Better Labeling Could Help Thwart Acetaminophen Overdose

HBNS STORY | May 3, 2011

When misused, acetaminophen — marketed as Tylenol — can lead to acute liver failure and worse, often due to accidental overdose by an uninformed consumer. A new small study looks at what’s missing in consumer education and how to overcome those gaps.