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Many Women Receive Unnecessary Pap Tests

HBNS STORY | September 30, 2014

As many as half to two-thirds of women who’ve undergone hysterectomies or are older than 65 years report receiving Pap tests for cervical cancer, despite recommendations against it, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Pressure from Providers Leads Some Women to Have C-Sections, Inductions

HBNS STORY | September 23, 2014

Pregnant women who felt pressured to have a labor induction or cesarean section by their obstetrical care providers were significantly more likely to have these procedures, even if there was no medical need for them, suggests a new study in Health Services Research.

Online Social Networking Linked to Use of Web for Health Info

HBNS STORY | September 16, 2014

The use of social networking sites like Facebook may have implications for accessing online health information, finds a new longitudinal study from the Journal of Health Communication.

Leaving Their Pediatricians Tough for Some Teens with Chronic Conditions

HBNS STORY | August 21, 2014

A new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health has found that one in five young adults with chronic illnesses said the transfer of their care from pediatrics to adult-oriented health care was unsatisfactory.

Patient-Centered Medical Homes Reduce Costs

HBNS STORY | July 31, 2014

As the number of patient centered medical homes has increased, a new report in the journal Health Services Research finds the model offers a promising option to reduce health care costs and utilization of some health care services.

Confidential Discussions Are Key to Improving Teen Health Visits

HBNS STORY | July 29, 2014

Teens who have the option to privately and confidentially discuss health concerns with their doctor are more likely to talk about certain issues than they would be in discussions where a parent is present, finds a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Lacking Trust in One's Doctor Affects Health of Emotionally Vulnerable Cancer Patients

HBNS STORY | July 22, 2014

The physical and mental well-being of people with cancer may be affected by how they feel about their relationship with their physician and by differences in attachment styles, finds a new study from General Hospital Psychiatry.

Early Palliative Care Cuts Costs for Critically Ill Patients

HBNS STORY | July 10, 2014

Palliative care delivered early during hospitalization can help cut costs for critically ill patients, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Class and Insurance Stigma Are Barriers to Good Health Care

HBNS STORY | June 19, 2014

Some low-income, uninsured and Medicaid patients report feeling stigma when interacting with health care providers, finds a new report in The Milbank Quarterly.

Shared Decision Making Missing in Cancer Screening Discussions

HBNS STORY | June 12, 2014

A national survey of patients reveals that physicians don’t always fully discuss the risks and benefits of cancer screening, reports a new study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

More Patient Education, Not Physician Training, Helps Control Diabetes

HBNS STORY | May 8, 2014

Teaching people with diabetes how to control their blood glucose levels, not their doctors, helps them achieve better results, finds a new study in Ethnicity and Disease.

Misunderstanding Health Insurance Leads Some to Overspend

HBNS STORY | May 1, 2014

Uninsured adults who didn't understand health insurance tended to have trouble selecting plans that aligned with their stated needs and spent more money, finds a study in Health Services Research.

A Phone Call from a Pharmacist Can Reduce Some Hospital Admissions

HBNS STORY | April 10, 2014

Pharmacist-patient telephone consultations appear to reduce hospitalizations in patients who are least at risk, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Online Ratings Don't Help Patients Compare Hospitals

HBNS STORY | March 18, 2014

Despite having access to online ratings, patients can’t distinguish the quality or performance of one hospital from another, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Patients Are Loyal to Their Doctors, Despite Performance Scores

HBNS STORY | March 11, 2014

Patients with an existing relationship with a doctor ranked as lower performing were no more likely to switch doctors than patients with higher performing doctors, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Many New Parents Unaware of Safety Guidelines

HBNS STORY | April 8, 2014

A new parent’s health literacy can affect their ability to follow recommendations to protect infants from injury, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Simple Waiting Room Test Can Help Diagnose Depression and Anxiety

HBNS STORY | February 25, 2014

A new study in General Hospital Psychiatry finds patients visiting the hospital for a variety of ailments can be easily screened for depression and anxiety as they wait for care.

With Training, Friends and Family Can Help Loved Ones Quit Tobacco

HBNS STORY | February 4, 2014

A new study in the American Journal of Health Behavior finds that teaching people about smoking cessation—even those without a medical background—can motivate them to encourage their friends, family and acquaintances to stop smoking.

Doctors Experienced with Using EHRs Say They Add Value for Patients

HBNS STORY | January 2, 2014

A majority of surveyed physicians said they were alerted to a potential medication error or critical lab value by an electronic health record, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Pharmacy Staff Frequently Misinform Teens Seeking Emergency Contraception

HBNS STORY | December 19, 2013

A new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health finds that pharmacy staff frequently give teens misleading or incorrect information about emergency contraception that may prevent them from getting the medication.

Many Patients Have Trouble ID’ing Their Medications

HBNS STORY | December 3, 2013

People who identified their medication by shape, size or color instead of name had poorer adherence and an increased risk of hospitalization, finds a recent study in the Journal of Health Communication: International Perspectives.

Unique Barriers for African Americans With High Blood Pressure

HBNS STORY | November 26, 2013

African Americans with high blood pressure who reported experiencing racial discrimination had lower rates of adherence to their blood pressure medication, finds a new study in the American Journal of Public Health.

Electronic Health Records Can Measure Patient-Centered Care

HBNS STORY | November 21, 2013

Electronic health records collect non-clinical information that can be used to measure a medical practice’s patient-centeredness, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Media Coverage of HPV Vaccine Boosts Reports of Adverse Effects

HBNS STORY | November 19, 2013

The number of adverse events reported for the HPV vaccine Gardasil® correlated with an increase in the number of media stories about the vaccine, finds a study in The Journal of Adolescent Health.

Race a Bigger Health Care Barrier Than Insurance Status

HBNS STORY | November 7, 2013

Blacks, Hispanics and Asians are less likely than non-Hispanic Whites to visit a health care professional, even with health insurance, finds a recent study in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved.

Teens with Chronic Illnesses Find It Hard to Stick to Treatment

HBNS STORY | October 29, 2013

Teens with a variety of chronic illnesses report facing similar barriers to taking their medications, according to a new review in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Trusting Their Doctor Helps People Manage Diabetes

HBNS STORY | September 26, 2013

Having trust in one’s physician has been correlated with better adherence to diabetes self-care, finds a new study in the American Journal of Health Behavior.

Rural Seniors Prefer Self-Care Over Doctors

HBNS STORY | August 15, 2013

A survey of older rural adults found a high degree of medical skepticism, the belief that one knows and can control their own health better than a medical professional can, reports a recent study in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved.

Men Say They Want Prostate Cancer Test, Despite Risks

HBNS STORY | July 9, 2013

A survey of men age 40 to 74 found that 54 percent said that they would still opt for a popular prostate cancer screening test despite recent recommendations that the test not be performed, finds a new study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Doctors Don’t Provide Sexual Health Info to Teens

HBNS STORY | June 11, 2013

Most sexually active teens don’t get information about sexual health from their health care providers, finds a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Teaching Patients about New Medications? A Picture Is Worth 1000 Words

HBNS STORY | April 30, 2013

Improving people’s knowledge and skills about their medications may be best achieved with multimedia patient education materials, finds a new systematic review in The Cochrane Library.

Primary Care Physicians Missing Early Signs of Serious Mental Illness

HBNS STORY | March 21, 2013

Primary care providers could help people with warning signs of psychosis get critical early treatment and potentially reduce the current burden on emergency departments and inpatient units, finds a study in the journal Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology.

Email and Texts to Doctors: Not Just for High-Income Patients

HBNS STORY | March 12, 2013

Low-income patients served by “safety-net” community health centers want to communicate with their doctors via email or text or are already doing so, according to a new study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Pharmacists Can Improve Patient Outcomes

HBNS STORY | February 28, 2013

In addition to dispensing, packaging or compounding medication, pharmacists can help improve patient outcomes in middle-income countries by offering targeted education, according to a new review in The Cochrane Library.

Decision Aids Sway More to Get Screened for Colon Cancer

HBNS STORY | November 6, 2012

People who are given tools to help them decide whether to have a colorectal cancer screening test are more are likely to request the procedure, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Even With Personalized Assessments, Many Underestimate Disease Risks

HBNS STORY | September 11, 2012

People with a family history of certain diseases, including heart disease and diabetes, often underestimate their risk for developing them, even after completing a risk assessment and receiving personalized prevention messages, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Use of Patient Centered Medical Home Features Not Related to Patients' Experience of Care

HBNS STORY | June 6, 2012

Providing patient care using key features of a Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH), a model of health care delivery promoted by major physician groups, may not influence what patients think about the care they receive, reports a new study in Health Services Research.

Doctors Need Training to Help Smokers Quit

HBNS STORY | May 17, 2012

Health care professionals do a better job helping people quit smoking when they are trained in smoking cessation techniques, a new Cochrane Library review finds.

Three Fears May Discourage Colorectal Cancer Screening

HBNS STORY | April 30, 2012

New research about why people forego colorectal cancer (CRC) screening suggests that three fears play a significant role; fear of embarrassment, fear of getting AIDS and fear of pain may make some seniors skip the potentially lifesaving tests.

Personalized Interventions Work Best for People with Multiple, Chronic Illnesses

HBNS STORY | April 18, 2012

People with multiple chronic medical conditions are helped by medical interventions that target personal risk factors and/or their ability to perform daily activities. Interventions aimed at general case management or enhancing teamwork among a patient’s care providers are not as effective, finds a new review in The Cochrane Library.

Primary Care Doctors Fail to Recognize Anxiety Disorders

HBNS STORY | February 21, 2012

Primary care providers fail to recognize anxiety disorders in two-thirds of patients with symptoms, reports a new study in General Hospital Psychiatry.

Doctor-Patient Relationship Influences Patient Engagement

HBNS STORY | November 29, 2011

Patients who feel their physicians treat them with respect and fairness, communicate well and engage with them outside of the office setting are more active in their own health care, according to new study in Health Services Research.

Employee Programs Teaching Health Care “Consumer” Skills May Also Produce Health Benefits

HBNS STORY | October 31, 2011

A workplace program designed to teach employees to act more like consumers when they make health care decisions, for example, by finding and evaluating health information or choosing a benefit plan, also improved exercise, diet and other health habits, according to a new study in the latest issue of the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Ethnic Differences in Appointment Keeping Affect Health of Diabetes Patients

HBNS STORY | October 27, 2011

Ethnic differences in appointment keeping may be an important factor in poor health outcomes among some minority patients with diabetes, according to a new study.

Reminder Packaging Helps Patients Take Medications as Directed

HBNS STORY | September 13, 2011

People with chronic illnesses are more likely to take long-term medications according to doctors’ instructions if the packaging includes a reminder system, according to a new review of evidence

Americans Face Barriers to Health Care Beyond Cost

HBNS STORY | August 19, 2011

Just getting to the doctor, making appointments and taking time off from work or other responsibilities are major hindrances for some people to getting the medical care they need.

Patient Navigators Might Reduce Disparities in Cancer Care

HBNS STORY | August 16, 2011

Past research shows that minorities suffer higher rates of advanced cancer and deaths from all types of cancer compared to whites. The role of “patient navigator” is emerging as a tool to address these disparities.

Obese Mexican-Americans Lack Diet, Exercise Advice From Doctors

HBNS STORY | June 30, 2011

Only half of obese Mexican-American adults receive diet and exercise advice from their physicians, although obesity is on the rise for this group.

Most Primary Care Physicians Don’t Address Patients’ Weight

HBNS STORY | June 7, 2011

Fewer than half of primary care physicians talk to their patients about diet, exercise and weight management consistently, while pediatricians are somewhat more likely to do so, according to two new studies.

Researchers Still Searching for Ways to Help Patients Take Their Meds

HBNS STORY | May 12, 2011

Clinicians have tried a variety of ways to encourage people to take prescribed medicines, but a new research review says it is still unclear whether many of these interventions have been effective.

RN Staffing Affects Patient Success After Discharge

HBNS STORY | April 26, 2011

When nurse staffing levels are higher on hospital units, patients tend do to better after discharge, as long as overtime isn’t involved.

More Seniors Get Flu Shot After Personalized Reminders, Provider Urging

HBNS STORY | September 7, 2010

Patient-centered Care Can Lower Risk of Death in Heart Attack

HBNS STORY | July 22, 2010

Surgery Is Good Teachable Moment to Help Smokers Quit

HBNS STORY | July 6, 2010

Self-Monitoring Lowers Risks for Patients on Anti-Clotting Drug

HBNS STORY | April 13, 2010