People with Mood Disorders Are More Likely to Be Re-Hospitalized

Release Date: June 19, 2012 | By David Pittman, Contributing Writer
Research Source: General Hospital Psychiatry

KEY POINTS

  • People with serious mood disorders are more likely to be admitted to the hospital for a medical concern and to be re-admitted soon after a hospital discharge than people without mental illness.
  • Medical treatment that includes mental health therapy may reduce the risk of subsequent hospitalization in people with physical and mood disorders.
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People with serious mental illness (SMI), such as bipolar and major depressive disorders, have increased mortality and physical illness and use greater health care resources than people without mood disorders.

A new study published in the journal General Hospital Psychiatry found that patients were more likely to be hospitalized and re-hospitalized soon after being discharged if they have mood disorders.

Study author Kenn B. Daratha, Ph.D., assistant professor at the Washington State University College of Nursing suggests patients with co-occurring mental health disorders are less likely to take care of themselves and practice fewer healthy habits. For example people with depression are nearly twice as likely to smoke as people without depression. Respiratory disease and problems were the most common cause of hospitalization for the study patients with mood disorders.

“We need to find ways where the medical and psychiatric side can work together in order to help the patient take control and manage their disease,” Daratha said.

Patients often have difficulty receiving both the primary and mental health care they need, so certain providers are looking to provide both. Lydia Chwastiak, M.D., associate professor at the University of Washington School of Medicine, said that most government agencies that treat the chronically mentally ill are looking to address this issue.

“They’re attempting to bring medical services into the mental health setting so that primary care and preventive care will be provided to patients who are pretty chronically mentally ill,” Chwastiak said.

Once researchers find what works best, they can expand on those methods. “There’s a lot going on,” she said. “It’s just a fairly new field.”

TERMS OF USE: This story is protected by copyright. When reproducing any material, including interview excerpts, attribution to the Health Behavior News Service, part of the Center for Advancing Health, is required. While the information provided in this news story is from the latest peer-reviewed research, it is not intended to provide medical advice or treatment recommendations. For medical questions or concerns, please consult a health care provider.

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For More Information:

Reach the Health Behavior News Service, part of the Center for Advancing Health, at hbns-editor@cfah.org or (202) 387-2829.

General Hospital Psychiatry is a peer-reviewed research journal published bimonthly by Elsevier Inc. For information about the journal, contact Wayne Katon, M.D., at (206) 543-7177.

Daratha, K.B., et al. (2012). Co-occurring mood disorders among hospitalized patients and risk for subsequent medical hospitalization. General Hospital Psychiatry.

 

Tags for this article:
Mental Health   Lifestyle and Prevention  



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