For People With Diabetes, Aggressive Blood Pressure Goals May Not Help

Release Date: November 12, 2013 | By Stephanie Stephens, HBNS Contributing Writer
Research Source: The Cochrane Library

KEY POINTS

  • For people with diabetes and high blood pressure, keeping blood pressure levels lower than the standard 140 over 90 mmHg offered no benefits.
  • Maintaining blood pressure levels lower than standard can mean an increase in medication, which can be inconvenient and costly.
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Many people with diabetes also have high blood pressure. Clinical guidelines have suggested blood pressure levels in people with diabetes should be kept lower than the standard for people without diabetes. However, a new review from The Cochrane Library does not find support for this practice.

“It’s been clinical practice to try to decrease blood pressure as much as possible in this group in order to reduce both mortality and morbidity,” said Jose Agustin Arguedas, M.D., professor in the department of clinical pharmacology at the University of Costa Rica. Several frequently used clinical guidelines suggest that people with diabetes should have blood pressure less than 130 over 80, he said.

Lowering blood pressure typically means increasing the number or dosage of medications, which can be inconvenient and expensive for patients.

In the new review, the researchers studied five trials with a total of 7,314 participants to evaluate whether lower blood pressure targets (less than 130/85 mmHg) for people with diabetes were better than standard blood pressure targets. The review determined that setting blood pressure targets lower than 140 over 90 mmHg in people with diabetes did not lower the risk of heart attack, stroke or death.

“From a diabetes perspective, people with type 2 diabetes have issues other than just blood sugar that determines ultimate risk for complications,” said John E. Anderson, M.D. president for science and medicine at the American Diabetes Association. “Patients with diabetes have increased risk of cardiovascular problems like stroke and heart attack and so treatment for blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol are of paramount importance. This Cochrane review correlates and conforms to our standards of care at ADA—that we should treat to target a goal of 140 over 80 or less.”

For some populations, he said, even more aggressive blood pressure targeting might be appropriate if it can be done without undue burden of medication.

“Surprisingly perhaps, most people assumed it was a recognized fact that we should try to get blood pressure [as low as possible] in this population and therefore additional research wasn’t needed,” noted Arguedas. “We showed we need more research to really answer the question about how to treat high blood pressure in order to achieve the greatest benefit and the lowest risk for this population.”

TERMS OF USE: This story is protected by copyright. When reproducing any material, including interview excerpts, attribution to the Health Behavior News Service, part of the Center for Advancing Health, is required. While the information provided in this news story is from the latest peer-reviewed research, it is not intended to provide medical advice or treatment recommendations. For medical questions or concerns, please consult a health care provider.

For More Information:

Reach the Health Behavior News Service, part of the Center for Advancing Health, at (202) 387-2829 or hbns-editor@cfah.org.

The Cochrane Library (http://www.thecochranelibrary.com) contains high quality health care information, including systematic reviews from The Cochrane Collaboration. These reviews bring together research on the effects of health care and are considered the gold standard for determining the relative effectiveness of different interventions.

Arguedas JA, Leiva V, Wright JM. Blood pressure targets for hypertension in people with diabetes mellitus. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2010, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD008277. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008277.

Tags for this article:
Diabetes   Heart Disease   Prescription Drugs   Medical/Hospital Practice   Evidence-Based Medicine   Make Good Treatment Decisions  



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