Tobacco Promotions Still Reaching Youth

Release Date: April 1, 2014 | By Milly Dawson, HBNS Contributing Writer
Research Source: Journal of Adolescent Health

KEY POINTS

  • Twelve percent of 15-to-17 year olds and 26 percent of 18-to-23 year olds were exposed to either direct-to-consumer coupons or promotional websites for tobacco products.
  • Teens and young adults who reported viewing tobacco marketing materials were more likely to have tried smoking or be current smokers than those not exposed to such marketing.
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Teens and young adults who are exposed to marketing materials for tobacco products, such as coupons and websites, were far more likely to begin smoking or to be current smokers than those not exposed, finds a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

“For several years, the emphasis in the tobacco industry has been on this sort of direct marketing, especially to young people who are highly price sensitive and who may find coupons, samples, and promotions appealing,” said lead author Samir Soneji, Ph.D., an assistant professor at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice.

The U.S. government has made efforts over time to limit tobacco advertising. In the 1960s, health concerns about tobacco prompted Congress to ban cigarette ads on television and radio. In 2010, the FDA prohibited tobacco company sponsorship of sporting and entertainment events and tobacco sales to children younger than 18, among other measures to further regulate tobacco.

Soneji’s research team explored whether exposure to coupons and promotional websites would increase the chances of a youngster starting to smoke and/or being a current smoker. “We found that both direct mail [coupons] and exposure to tobacco websites were associated with increased chances of smoking initiation and current smoking.” He emphasized that the study isn’t showing causation, but rather a striking degree of association.

During 2011, the researchers recruited a sample of 2,541 young people between ages 15 and 23. Each participant completed both a phone-based and a web-based survey. The youths received $10 for the phone survey and additional $10 or $25 for completion of the web based survey. “Overall, 12 percent of 15- to-17-year olds and 26 percent of 18- to-23-year olds were exposed to either form of direct-to-consumer tobacco marketing,” coupons received via US mail or websites, the authors wrote.

Although the websites are supposedly restricted to adults, youngsters may have gained access by using their parents’ or another adult’s login information. “Stricter, better enforced regulation on the recipients of direct-to-consumer tobacco marketing could reduce youth smoking.” In the meantime, parents who smoke who remove their names from industry mailing lists may decrease their children’s exposure to coupons and, in turn, the risk of their children smoking, the authors wrote.

“This article is important for all concerned about youth smoking,” said Richard Brunswick, M.D., a physician who has written an evidence-based primer on smoking cessation entitled Can’t Quit? You CAN Stop Smoking. “Much remains to be done with regards to enforcement [of FDA powers to control tobacco marketing]  so that adolescents  and young adults don’t obtain materials or access to websites that promote the use of tobacco, the only product available that kills those who use it as directed.”

TERMS OF USE: This story is protected by copyright. When reproducing any material, including interview excerpts, attribution to the Health Behavior News Service, part of the Center for Advancing Health, is required. While the information provided in this news story is from the latest peer-reviewed research, it is not intended to provide medical advice or treatment recommendations. For medical questions or concerns, please consult a health care provider.

For More Information:

Reach the Health Behavior News Service, part of the Center for Advancing Health, at (202) 387-2829 or hbns-editor@cfah.org

Journal of Adolescent Health: Contact Tor Berg at (415) 502-1373 or tor.berg@ucsf.edu or visit www.jahonline.org

Tags for this article:
Smoking   Promote your Health   Get Preventive Health Care   Children and Young People's Health   Peer Influence   Lifestyle and Prevention   Environment and Health  



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