HEALTH BEHAVIOR NEWS SERVICE

Health Behavior News Service covers the latest peer-reviewed studies and systematic reviews on the effects of behavior on health, health disparities and patient engagement research. Our goal is to present the facts for readers to understand and use to make informed choices about health and health care.

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Pharmacy Staff Frequently Misinform Teens Seeking Emergency Contraception

December 19, 2013
A new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health finds that pharmacy staff frequently give teens misleading or incorrect information about emergency contraception that may prevent them from getting the medication.

Admitted for “Observation”? Watch Out for Big Medical Bills

December 19, 2013
Patients who are placed in observation instead of being admitted to a hospital may face high out-of-pocket costs for treatment, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Minorities and Poor More Likely to Suffer from Restless Sleep and Chronic Diseases

December 17, 2013
The poor and minorities tend to suffer from poor sleep and chronic disease more often, but sleep does not appear to be a root cause of disease disparity, finds a new study in Ethnicity & Disease.

Buck Teeth: Correct Them Once In Early Adolescence

December 17, 2013
A Cochrane review finds few benefits to a two-stage orthodontic correction for buck teeth in children versus treatment done in one-stage during early adolescence.

Massachusetts Residents Healthier After Health Care Reform

December 12, 2013
Residents of Massachusetts saw small gains in health status following the enactment of a state-wide health insurance mandate in 2006, finds a new study in the Milbank Quarterly.

Significant Economic Losses When Young Women Die From Breast Cancer

December 12, 2013
In 2008, breast cancer deaths in women under age 50 cost the economy $5.49 billion in productivity and resulted in an estimated 7.98 million years of potential life lost, finds a study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Immigration Status Impacts Health, Especially for the Young

December 10, 2013
Age at immigration and citizenship status may have health implications for immigrants, finds a new study in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Doctors Unaware That More Teens Are Turning to E-Cigarettes

December 10, 2013
Many clinicians are unfamiliar with or uncomfortable with addressing the use of e-cigarettes with their young patients, finds a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Better Diagnoses May Help Vets with Anxiety Get Treatment

December 5, 2013
Veterans who suffer from anxiety may not get appropriate treatment for want of a specific diagnosis, finds a new study in General Hospital Psychiatry.

Many Patients Have Trouble ID’ing Their Medications

December 3, 2013
People who identified their medication by shape, size or color instead of name had poorer adherence and an increased risk of hospitalization, finds a recent study in the Journal of Health Communication: International Perspectives.

Combining Alcohol With Energy Drinks Can Lead to Heavier Drinking

December 3, 2013
Young people who mix alcohol with a caffeinated energy drink drank more heavily and reported more negative consequences of drinking than those who just drank alcohol, finds a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Unique Barriers for African Americans With High Blood Pressure

November 26, 2013
African Americans with high blood pressure who reported experiencing racial discrimination had lower rates of adherence to their blood pressure medication, finds a new study in the American Journal of Public Health.

Alcohol Use Disorders Linked to Death and Disability

November 26, 2013
Disorders related to the abuse of alcohol contribute significantly to the burden of disease in the U.S., finds a new study in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

Electronic Health Records Can Measure Patient-Centered Care

November 21, 2013
Electronic health records collect non-clinical information that can be used to measure a medical practice’s patient-centeredness, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Media Coverage of HPV Vaccine Boosts Reports of Adverse Effects

November 19, 2013
The number of adverse events reported for the HPV vaccine Gardasil® correlated with an increase in the number of media stories about the vaccine, finds a study in The Journal of Adolescent Health.

Teens from Military Families Suffer from Deployments

November 19, 2013
Teens that have had a parent or sibling on military deployment were more likely to have suicidal thoughts or be depressed than teens without military connections, finds a new study in The Journal of Adolescent Health.

Smartphone Apps to Help Smokers Quit Come Up Short

November 14, 2013
Most popular smartphone apps do not include evidence-based practices known to help smokers quit, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Cuts to Local Health Departments Hurt Communities

November 14, 2013
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that many local health departments aren’t able to meet goals to increase health care access.

For People With Diabetes, Aggressive Blood Pressure Goals May Not Help

November 12, 2013
For people with diabetes and high blood pressure, keeping blood pressure levels lower than the standard recommended offered no benefits, finds a review in The Cochrane Library.

Chronic Pain and Emotional Distress Often Treated With Risky Medications

November 12, 2013
People with chronic pain and emotional distress are more likely to be given ongoing prescriptions for opioid drugs, which may not help, finds a new review in General Hospital Psychiatry.

Teen Athletes at Risk for Medication Misuse

November 10, 2013
Male adolescents who participate in organized sports are more likely to be prescribed opioid medications and misuse them than male teens that don’t play sports, finds a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Teens with Late Bedtimes Have Lower Grades

November 10, 2013
Late bedtimes during the school year, especially in younger teens, predicted a lower cumulative grade point average and more emotional distress by college age, finds a new article in Journal of Adolescent Health.

Race a Bigger Health Care Barrier Than Insurance Status

November 7, 2013
Blacks, Hispanics and Asians are less likely than non-Hispanic Whites to visit a health care professional, even with health insurance, finds a recent study in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved.

Lifestyle Behaviors Key to Post-Deployment Health of Veterans

October 31, 2013
A new study in the American Journal of Health Promotion finds that the lifestyle of veterans both pre- and post-deployment influences their post-deployment wellness.

Banning Workplace Smoking Not Enough

October 31, 2013
Failing to address the presence of other smokers at home limits the effectiveness of workplace smoking restrictions, finds a new study in American Journal of Health Promotion.

Veterans Groups Miss Opportunities to Curb Tobacco Use

October 31, 2013
Websites targeting veterans fail to provide information about the risks of tobacco products despite high rates of smoking in the military, finds a new report in the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Teens with Chronic Illnesses Find It Hard to Stick to Treatment

October 29, 2013
Teens with a variety of chronic illnesses report facing similar barriers to taking their medications, according to a new review in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Students with Fake IDs at Greater Risk for Alcohol Abuse

October 17, 2013
Students who used false IDs more often were at increased risk for alcohol use disorder, according to a new longitudinal study in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

Healthy Food Rarely Convenient for Urban Minorities

October 15, 2013
A survey of stores in a predominantly black, low income area of Philadelphia found that nearly 80 percent received low ratings for the availability of healthy food, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Weight Loss Apps Lack Key Ingredients for Success

October 10, 2013
Weight loss mobile applications may work well as basic tracking devices, but need to do more to help dieters, according to a new report in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Unaccompanied Teens Often Unable to Get Needed Vaccines

October 8, 2013
Health care providers say that older teens often go to the doctor without a parent who can provide consent for needed vaccinations, finds a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Parents Play a Role in Teen Eating Disorders

October 3, 2013
The ways parents or caregivers interact with children around mealtimes can have unintended consequences, according to a new report in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

It May Not “Get Better” For Bisexual Teens

October 1, 2013
A new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health finds that bisexual teens may be at risk for suicide even into young adulthood.

Trusting Their Doctor Helps People Manage Diabetes

September 26, 2013
Having trust in one’s physician has been correlated with better adherence to diabetes self-care, finds a new study in the American Journal of Health Behavior.

Women in Appalachia Have Higher Rates of Late Stage Breast Cancer

September 26, 2013
Older women living in the most deprived areas of the U.S. Appalachia had higher rates of late stage breast cancer than women in more affluent areas, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Exercise Benefits People with Asthma

September 24, 2013
People with asthma who engaged in appropriate exercise programs had improved cardiovascular fitness and an overall improved quality of life, finds a new review in The Cochrane Library.

Treating Depression Helps Some Smokers Quit

September 19, 2013
Adding mood management strategies to smoking cessation programs helped people with depression or a history of depression quit smoking for longer periods than a standard program, finds a new review in The Cochrane Library

Binge Eating More Likely to Lead to Health Risks in Men

September 17, 2013
Binge eating is a problem affecting both men and women however, obese men who binge are more likely than their female counterparts to have elevated cholesterol and high blood pressure, finds a new study in General Hospital Psychiatry.

More Education, Not Income, Fights Obesity

September 12, 2013
Higher education, rather than income, protects women in disadvantaged neighborhoods from obesity, finds a new study in American Journal of Health Promotion.

Kids Get More Exercise in Smart Growth Neighborhoods

September 10, 2013
Children who live in smart growth neighborhoods, designed to improve walkability, get 46 percent more moderate or vigorous physical activity than those who live in conventional neighborhoods, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Less than 10 Minutes of Brisk Activity Helps Maintain a Healthy Weight

September 5, 2013
Short bursts of less than 10 minutes of higher-intensity physical activity reduce the risk of obesity, finds a new study in the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Exercising with Others Helps College Students Reduce Stress

September 3, 2013
College students who exercise with friends are less likely to report feeling stressed, finds a new study in the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Body Image Tied to Suicidal Thoughts in Young Teens

August 29, 2013
Seeing oneself as overweight or obese may be an important, independent predictor of suicidal thoughts, especially in young girls, reports a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Restricting Food and Fluids During Labor is Unwarranted

August 22, 2013
Despite the longstanding, widespread practice of restricting women’s food and fluid intake during labor, a large-scale analysis in The Cochrane Library finds it unwarranted and supports women eating and drinking as they please.

Bedwetting Treatments Offer Help

August 20, 2013
Simple treatments for bed-wetting are better than nothing at all, but aren’t as effective as more advanced alarm therapy or drug therapy, according to a new meta-analysis in The Cochrane Library.

Rural Seniors Prefer Self-Care Over Doctors

August 15, 2013
A survey of older rural adults found a high degree of medical skepticism, the belief that one knows and can control their own health better than a medical professional can, reports a recent study in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved.

Teens with Fighting Injuries Have Declines in IQ

August 13, 2013
Teenagers who have been seriously injured in a fight show a reduction in intelligence and cognitive ability, according to a large study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

High Lifetime Costs for Type 2 Diabetes

August 8, 2013
A person with type 2 diabetes spends on average more than $85,000 treating the disease and its complications over their lifetime, according to a recent study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Cancer Survivors Not Receiving Preventive Care

August 6, 2013
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that some cancer survivors do not always have the best access to primary care and that the type of health insurance they have—or don’t have—may be a factor.

Do Antioxidants Improve a Woman’s Chances of Conceiving?

August 6, 2013
There is no high quality evidence that antioxidant supplements help to increase a woman’s chances of having a baby, according to the results of a new Cochrane review.

Teens Missing Recommended Vaccines

August 1, 2013
Health care providers are missing opportunities to improve teens’ vaccination coverage, reports a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Employers Can Motivate Employees to Get Moving

July 30, 2013
Workplace efforts to encourage employees to increase physical activity are most effective when they incorporate tools such as pedometers and related electronic health information, finds a new review in the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Significant Others Can Influence Extreme Dieting

July 25, 2013
Women who are frequently encouraged by their significant others to lose weight are more likely to resort to unhealthy measures to do so, according to new research in the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Unemployment Linked to Reduced Use of Preventive Health Care

July 23, 2013
Fluctuations in the unemployment rate affect people’s health care choices, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Blacks and Latinos Seek Mental Health Care Less Often

July 18, 2013
Blacks and Latinos receive less adequate mental health care than Whites, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Obesity Is a Major Obstacle for Disabled Americans

July 16, 2013
Obesity and its related health problems impacts far more people with a disability than previously reported, according to new research in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Wellness Programs Linked to Healthier Foods in Schools

July 11, 2013
A new study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that schools with more robust federal wellness programs offer healthier foods and beverages, including foods offered in vending machines, school stores and a la carte sales.

Later Cord Clamping After Birth Increases Iron Levels in Babies

July 11, 2013
Delaying clamping of the umbilical cord after birth benefits newborn babies, according to a systematic review published in The Cochrane Library.

Men Say They Want Prostate Cancer Test, Despite Risks

July 9, 2013
A survey of men age 40 to 74 found that 54 percent said that they would still opt for a popular prostate cancer screening test despite recent recommendations that the test not be performed, finds a new study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Lower Coronary Heart Disease Deaths By Making Several Lifestyle Changes

July 9, 2013
Programs to address multiple health behaviors, such as diet and exercise, significantly lowered the risk of a fatal heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular event in people with coronary heart disease, finds a new review in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Electronic Health Record Adoption Uneven Across U.S.

June 27, 2013
A new study in Health Services Research finds wide geographic variation in the adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) by ambulatory health care sites.

Hispanic and Black Kids Less Likely to Use Medication to Control Asthma

June 27, 2013
Black and Hispanic children with asthma are less likely than White children to use long-term asthma control medications, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Nursing Homes with More Black Residents Do Poorly

June 25, 2013
Nursing homes with higher proportions of Black residents do worse financially and deliver lower-quality care than nursing homes with few or no Black residents, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Negative Public Health Campaigns May Undermine Weight Loss Goals

June 20, 2013
Public health campaigns that stigmatize obese people by using negative images or text do not motivate them to lose weight any more than more neutral campaigns, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

First Sips of Alcohol Start in Second Grade

June 18, 2013
The age at which many children in the U.S. take their first sip of alcohol is surprisingly young, finds a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Taxing Unhealthy Food Spurs People to Buy Less

June 18, 2013
Labeling foods and beverages as less healthy and taxing them motivates people to make healthier choices, finds a recent study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Emergency Departments Still Missing Signs of Pelvic Disease in Teens

June 13, 2013
Despite government efforts to expand diagnostic criteria for pelvic inflammatory disease, ER doctors are not identifying the condition any more often in adolescent girls, finds a new study in Journal of Adolescent Health.

Doctors Don’t Provide Sexual Health Info to Teens

June 11, 2013
Most sexually active teens don’t get information about sexual health from their health care providers, finds a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Quitting Smoking: Licensed Medications Are Effective

June 6, 2013
Nicotine replacement therapy and other licensed drugs can help people quit smoking, according to a new systematic review published in The Cochrane Library.

Probiotics Prevent Diarrhea Related To Antibiotic Use

June 6, 2013
Probiotic supplements have the potential to prevent diarrhea caused by antibiotics, according to a new review in The Cochrane Library.

Cyberbullying Puts Teens at Risk

June 4, 2013
Teenage victims of cyberbullying, defined as the use of the internet or cell phones to send hurtful and harassing messages, are more likely to develop symptoms of depression, substance abuse and internet addiction, reports a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Walking Leads to Better Health for Older Men

May 30, 2013
The more an older man walks, the better his physical and mental health and his quality of life are likely to be, finds a new study in the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Parents’ Activity Unlikely to Influence Teen Fitness

May 28, 2013
Teens don’t necessarily follow in their parents’ footsteps when it comes to physical activity, finds a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Teens Have Unsupervised Access to Prescription Drugs

May 23, 2013
Most teens have unsupervised access to their prescription drugs at home, including drugs with potential for abuse, finds a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Breast Cancer Treatments Delayed for Black and Rural Women

May 21, 2013
Black women with breast cancer are more likely than Hispanic or white women to experience delays in the initiation of chemotherapy or radiation after surgery, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Predominately Black Hospitals Provide Poor Trauma Care

May 16, 2013
Victims of trauma are at higher risk of either dying or suffering a major complication if they are treated at a hospital that serves a large population of black patients, finds a large new study in Health Services Research.

Teens Experience Both Sides of Dating Violence

May 14, 2013
Teens in a relationship that involves dating violence are likely to be both a victim and perpetrator, as opposed to being just one or the other, finds a recent study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Calorie Counts on Menus Have Small but Promising Effects

May 9, 2013
Menu labeling has made more people aware of how many calories are in restaurant meals and has some people reducing their intake, according to new research published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Black Students Drink More Soda When Available at School

May 9, 2013
The availability of sugar-sweetened or diet soda in schools does not appear to be related to students’ overall consumption, except for African-American students, who drink more soda when it’s available at school, finds a study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Teens Overeat at Subway, Too

May 7, 2013
Adolescents are just as likely to consume too many calories at Subway as at McDonald’s, a new study in Journal of Adolescent Health finds, despite the fact that they think Subway offers healthier food.

Chronic Pain Sufferers Likely to Have Anxiety

May 7, 2013
Patients coping with chronic pain should also be evaluated for anxiety disorders, according to new research published in General Hospital Psychiatry.

Providing Workplace Wellness Centers Could Backfire

May 2, 2013
People who signed up for a workplace wellness center but then used it infrequently experienced declines in their mental quality-of-life, finds a new study in the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Teaching Patients about New Medications? A Picture Is Worth 1000 Words

April 30, 2013
Improving people’s knowledge and skills about their medications may be best achieved with multimedia patient education materials, finds a new systematic review in The Cochrane Library.

Smoking Prevention in Schools: Does it Work?

April 30, 2013
Smoking prevention in schools reduces the number of young people who will later become smokers, according to a new systematic review published in The Cochrane Library.

Targeting Prescribers Can Reduce Excessive Use of Antibiotics in Hospitals

April 30, 2013
Giving prescribers access to education and advice or imposing restrictions on use can curb overuse or inappropriate use of antibiotics in hospitals, according to a new Cochrane systematic review.

Credit Card Debt Leads Some to Skip Medical Care

April 25, 2013
People with outstanding credit card or medical debt were more likely to delay or avoid medical or dental care, finds a new study in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Birthing Centers Provide Equal or Better Deliveries

April 18, 2013
Low-income women who chose to deliver their baby at a birthing center under the care of a certified nurse-midwife had the same or better birthing experience as women under traditional care with a hospital-based obstetrician, according to a new study in Health Services Research.

Smoke-Free Public Housing Would = Better Health and Savings

April 16, 2013
Establishing smoke-free policies for public housing would help protect residents, visitors and employees from the harmful effects of smoking and result in significant cost savings, reports a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Alcohol and Mental Health Problems a Costly Combo for ICU Patients

April 16, 2013
People admitted to a hospital ICU with alcohol withdrawal were more likely to be readmitted or die within a year if they had a co-existing mental health condition, finds a new study in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

Churches Minister Better Health in African American Communities

April 9, 2013
African Americans who believe their church is responsible for promoting health in their members and the community are also more willing to attend church-based health fairs, according to a new study in Health Promotion Practice.

Unwilling to Pay Extra for Wellness

April 9, 2013
Although most overweight adults agree that health insurance benefits designed to promote weight loss are a good idea, they don’t want to pay extra for them, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Depressed Teens Have Rocky Twenties

April 2, 2013
Depressed teenagers are more likely to have serious problems during their twenties, including ongoing mental illness and excessive drinking, finds a recent study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Prebiotics: Do Supplements In Baby Formula Help Prevent Allergies?

March 28, 2013
Prebiotic supplements in infant formula may help to prevent eczema, according to a systematic review published in The Cochrane Library.

Diabetes: Computer Based Interventions Provide Limited Support

March 28, 2013
Self-management interventions delivered by computer and mobile phone currently provide limited benefits for people with diabetes, according to a systematic review published in The Cochrane Library.

Reduce Use of Antipsychotic Drugs in Elderly with Dementia

March 28, 2013
Most older adults with dementia can successfully be taken off antipsychotic medications, which have negative side effects and increase the risk of death, finds a new evidence review from The Cochrane Library.

School Grades Go Down When Health Risks Go Up

March 26, 2013
Academic performance is linked to risky health behaviors in children and teens, reports a new review in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Primary Care Physicians Missing Early Signs of Serious Mental Illness

March 21, 2013
Primary care providers could help people with warning signs of psychosis get critical early treatment and potentially reduce the current burden on emergency departments and inpatient units, finds a study in the journal Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology.

Elderly Women in Rural Areas Less Likely to Recover from Depression

March 19, 2013
Being female and living in a rural area are among several factors that predicted whether an elderly person with depression recovered over the course of a year, finds a recent study in Depression Research and Treatment.

Email and Texts to Doctors: Not Just for High-Income Patients

March 12, 2013
Low-income patients served by “safety-net” community health centers want to communicate with their doctors via email or text or are already doing so, according to a new study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Mandating Fruits & Vegetables in School Meals Makes a Difference

March 12, 2013
State laws that require minimum levels of fruits and vegetables in school meals may give a small boost to the amount of these foods in adolescents' diets, according to a study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Housing Improvements Should Be Targeted at Those in Poorest Health

March 5, 2013
Improving housing can improve health, particularly when interventions are targeted at those in the poorest health, according to a systematic review published in The Cochrane Library.

Pharmacists Can Improve Patient Outcomes

February 28, 2013
In addition to dispensing, packaging or compounding medication, pharmacists can help improve patient outcomes in middle-income countries by offering targeted education, according to a new review in The Cochrane Library.

Screening Decisions Are Better Informed When Risk Information Is Personalized

February 28, 2013
Patients’ ability to make genuinely informed choices about undergoing disease screening increases when the risk information that they receive is related to their own personal risk, rather than average risks, according to the results of a Cochrane systematic review.

Friendships Are Good for Our Health

February 28, 2013
While participating in social activities and organizations promotes health, having personal ties with friends is even better, finds a new study in the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Marijuana & Alcohol Use Common among 10th Grade Students

February 26, 2013
A recent survey found high rates of regular alcohol and illicit and prescription drug use in tenth graders, reports a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Obesity Lowers Quality of Life in Boys

February 19, 2013
Being overweight or obese significantly reduces health-related quality of life in boys, but not girls, when compared to normal weight peers, finds a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Despite Challenges, Health Centers Have High Satisfaction Rates

February 14, 2013
Low-income Americans are more likely to be satisfied with the care they receive at federally qualified health centers (FQHC) than at mainstream health care providers, reveals a new study in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved.

Diabetes + Depression = Increased Risk of Death

February 13, 2013
People living with diabetes who also have untreated depression are at increased risk of death, according to a recent evidence review in General Hospital Psychiatry.

Accidental Poisonings Leading Cause of Deaths at Home

February 5, 2013
An increasing number of people die from unintentional home injury, in large part due to accidental drug overdose, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Drugs to Treat Fibromyalgia Just as Likely to Harm as Help

January 31, 2013
Among fibromyalgia patients taking either of two commonly prescribed drugs to reduce pain, 22 percent report substantial improvement while 21 percent had to quit the regimen due to unpleasant side effects, according to a new review in The Cochrane Library.

Current Evidence Does Not Support Selenium for Preventing Heart Disease in Well-Nourished Adults

January 31, 2013
A systematic review published today in The Cochrane Library finds that in well-nourished adults current evidence does not support selenium for preventing heart disease.

Half of At-Risk Older Adults Aren’t Getting Routine HIV Screening

January 29, 2013
Almost half of older adults visiting a public health clinic where HIV/AIDS was prevalent were not screened for the disease in the past 12 months, finds a study in The Gerontologist.

Commuting to Work by Car Linked to Weight Gain

January 22, 2013
According to a study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, urban residents who drive to work gain more weight than those who do not commute by car.

Children and Siblings of Deployed Military More Likely to Use Drugs

January 17, 2013
Youth with a deployed military parent or sibling use drugs and alcohol at a higher rate than their peers, finds a new study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

White Young Adults More Likely to DUI

January 15, 2013
White young adults were 50 percent more likely than their Black, Hispanic or Asian peers to self-report driving after drinking at age 21, finds a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Blacks Missing Out on Critical Early Treatment for Strokes

January 10, 2013
Getting to the emergency room within the first few hours of recognizing stroke symptoms can help prevent permanent brain damage, but a recent study in Ethnicity & Disease finds that Blacks are only half as likely as Whites to get timely treatment.

Age and Gender Predict Participation in Employer Sponsored Health Coaching Programs

January 8, 2013
A new study in American Journal of Health Promotion finds that whether or not workers enroll and participate in workplace health coaching programs depends more on the worker than on an employer’s motivational tactics.

Just 10 Minutes of Physical Activity Multiple Times a Day Improves Health

January 3, 2013
An active lifestyle that includes engaging in physical activity for less than 10 minutes multiple times a day can have the same health benefits as more structured exercise, finds a new study in the American Journal of Health Promotion.