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Most African-American Adults Skip Sun Protection, Study Suggests
HBNS STORY | February 2, 2010

Blacks Less Likely to Survive Cancer Than Whites in Large N.J. Study
HBNS STORY | February 2, 2010

Latino and White Children Might Receive Different Pain Treatment
HBNS STORY | February 4, 2010

Unequal Health Care Increases Colorectal Cancer Mortality in Blacks
HBNS STORY | August 19, 2010

Programs Help More Blacks Get Needed Colorectal Cancer Screening
HBNS STORY | October 29, 2010
African-Americans are less likely than whites to be screened for colorectal cancer, and the disparity almost certainly contributes to higher mortality. A new review of studies identifies effective strategies for improving the situation, but suggests that work remains to be done.

Death Rates Remain Higher for Poor Black Americans
HBNS STORY | February 24, 2011
In 2000, a black, working-aged resident of a poor neighborhood significantly was more likely to die than a white American — a situation that essentially remained unchanged from 20 years earlier.

Black Men at Both Ends of Economic Spectrum at Risk for Depression
HBNS STORY | March 8, 2011
Jobless African-American men might be at a greater risk of suffering from depression—as are African-American men making $80,000 and upward.

African-Americans More Active Users of Smoking “Quitlines”
HBNS STORY | April 29, 2011
African-Americans are consistently more likely than white smokers to use telephone help lines to quit smoking, finds a long-term California study.

African-Americans With Thyroid Cancer Fare Worse Than Whites
HBNS STORY | June 21, 2011
African-Americans have fewer incidences of thyroid cancer but have a more advanced form of the disease once they receive a diagnosis — and are more likely to die from it, according to a new study.

Prejudice Linked to Depression, Anxiety in Gay and Bisexual Black Men
HBNS STORY | August 30, 2011
The harassment, discrimination and negative feelings about homosexuality that black gay and bisexual men often experience can contribute significantly to mental health disorders such as depression and anxiety, a small new study finds.

Even Outside “Stroke Belt,” African-Americans Face Higher Mortality
HBNS STORY | September 1, 2011
African-Americans and country folk outside the so-called “stroke belt” are at higher risk for stroke death than other populations, a large new study finds.

'Health Care Deserts' More Common In Black Neighborhoods
HBNS STORY | April 25, 2012
New research into "health care deserts" finds that primary-care physicians are especially hard to find in predominantly Black and/or low-income Hispanic metropolitan neighborhoods.

Blacks & Hypertension Link Persists Across Age and Economic Status
HBNS STORY | June 1, 2012
African-Americans are at higher risk for developing hypertension than Whites or Mexican Americans, even if they’ve managed to avoid high blood pressure earlier in life.

Mental Health Care Disparities Persist for Black and Latino Children
HBNS STORY | June 21, 2012
Disparities in the use of mental health services, including outpatient care and psychotropic drug prescriptions, persist for black and Latino children, reports a new study in Health Services Research.

Predominately Black-Serving Hospitals Provide Poorer Care
HBNS STORY | July 19, 2012
Hospitals that mostly serve Black patients have worse mortality outcomes for both Black and White patients with three common conditions: heart attack, congestive heart failure or pneumonia. The new study in Health Services Research suggests that there is an urgent need to improve care at predominately black-serving institutions.

Churches Minister Better Health in African American Communities
HBNS STORY | April 9, 2013
African Americans who believe their church is responsible for promoting health in their members and the community are also more willing to attend church-based health fairs, according to a new study in Health Promotion Practice.

Black Students Drink More Soda When Available at School
HBNS STORY | May 9, 2013
The availability of sugar-sweetened or diet soda in schools does not appear to be related to students’ overall consumption, except for African-American students, who drink more soda when it’s available at school, finds a study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Nursing Homes with More Black Residents Do Poorly
HBNS STORY | June 25, 2013
Nursing homes with higher proportions of Black residents do worse financially and deliver lower-quality care than nursing homes with few or no Black residents, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Hispanic and Black Kids Less Likely to Use Medication to Control Asthma
HBNS STORY | June 27, 2013
Black and Hispanic children with asthma are less likely than White children to use long-term asthma control medications, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Healthy Food Rarely Convenient for Urban Minorities
HBNS STORY | October 15, 2013
A survey of stores in a predominantly black, low income area of Philadelphia found that nearly 80 percent received low ratings for the availability of healthy food, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Race a Bigger Health Care Barrier Than Insurance Status
HBNS STORY | November 7, 2013
Blacks, Hispanics and Asians are less likely than non-Hispanic Whites to visit a health care professional, even with health insurance, finds a recent study in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved.

Unique Barriers for African Americans With High Blood Pressure
HBNS STORY | November 26, 2013
African Americans with high blood pressure who reported experiencing racial discrimination had lower rates of adherence to their blood pressure medication, finds a new study in the American Journal of Public Health.

Minorities and Poor More Likely to Suffer from Restless Sleep and Chronic Diseases
HBNS STORY | December 17, 2013
The poor and minorities tend to suffer from poor sleep and chronic disease more often, but sleep does not appear to be a root cause of disease disparity, finds a new study in Ethnicity & Disease.

Men, Elderly, Minorities Not Getting Treated for Depression
HBNS STORY | February 6, 2014
Depression rates are increasing in the U.S. and under-treatment is widespread, especially among certain groups including men, the poor, the elderly and ethnic minorities, finds a new study in General Hospital Psychiatry.

African Americans' Concept of Health May Be More Than Physical
HBNS STORY | February 13, 2014
Some African-Americans rate their health as good, despite being overweight or having high blood pressure, finds a new study in Ethnicity and Disease.

Blacks with Financial Worries Have Lower Health Scores
HBNS STORY | April 15, 2014
Black adults who reported feeling more financial strain also rated their health more poorly than those with less financial strain, finds a new study in the American Journal of Health Behavior.

Minorities Face Disparities in Treatment and Outcomes of Atrial Fibrillation
HBNS STORY | April 29, 2014
Minority patients with atrial fibrillation, a heart condition that increases the risk of stroke, were less likely to receive common treatments and more likely to die from the condition than their white counterparts, finds a new study in Ethnicity and Disease.

Low Self-Rating of Social Status Predicts Heart Disease Risk
HBNS STORY | May 6, 2014
How a person defines their own socioeconomic standing (SES) within their community can help predict their risk of cardiovascular disease, but only among Whites, not Blacks, finds a recent study in Ethnicity and Disease.

More Patient Education, Not Physician Training, Helps Control Diabetes
HBNS STORY | May 8, 2014
Teaching people with diabetes how to control their blood glucose levels, not their doctors, helps them achieve better results, finds a new study in Ethnicity and Disease.

When It Comes to Health Disparities, Place Matters More Than Race
HBNS STORY | July 17, 2014
Blacks and Whites living in an integrated, low-income urban area had similar rates of treatment and management of hypertension, or high blood pressure, finds a new study in Ethnicity & Disease.

Inadequate Mental Health Care for Blacks with Depression and Diabetes, High Blood Pressure
HBNS STORY | July 24, 2014
A new study in General Hospital Psychiatry confirms that Blacks with depression plus another chronic medical condition, such as Type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure, do not receive adequate mental health treatment.

Family History of Undertreatment May Discourage Blacks from Seeking Mental Health Care
HBNS STORY | August 7, 2014
Blacks with a family history of untreated mental health disorders are less likely to seek treatment, even when they rate their own mental health as poor, finds a new study in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Poor Health Habits Linked to Financial Insecurity
HBNS STORY | September 4, 2014
Financial hardship, or feeling that one can’t make ends meet, may be more predictive of health risk behaviors than actual income levels for people with low-incomes, finds a recent study in the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Only Half of U.S. Adults Over 45 Are Screened for Diabetes
HBNS STORY | September 25, 2014
A new cross-sectional study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that only half of adults in the U.S. were screened for diabetes within the last three years, less than what is recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA).

Nationality at Birth Plays a Role in U.S. Adult Vaccination Rates
HBNS STORY | October 14, 2014
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that foreign-born adult U.S. residents, who make up about 13 percent of the population, receive vaccinations at significantly lower rates than U.S.-born adults. This gap in care puts them at greater risk of exposure to several vaccine-preventable diseases.

Physician Behaviors May Contribute to Disparities in Mental Health Care
HBNS STORY | December 3, 2014
The way medical doctors initially assess, treat and refer racial and ethnic minority patients may contribute to known disparities in their use of mental health services, according to a new study in Health Services Research.