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Medicaid Payments for Office Visits Impact Cancer Screening Rates
HBNS STORY | November 20, 2014
New research in the journal Cancer finds that Medicaid recipients are more likely to undergo cancer screening tests when their doctors receive higher reimbursements for routine office visits rather than for the tests themselves.

Some Psychiatric Patients Are More Frequent Users of Hospital ERs
HBNS STORY | November 13, 2014
New research in General Hospital Psychiatry finds that homelessness, cocaine use, being on Medicare, having a personality disorder or having liver disease appears to be a predictor of frequent ED use by people with a psychiatric illness.

Fecal Blood Test May Save More Lives Than Colonoscopy
HBNS STORY | October 21, 2014
Colorectal cancer, or CRC, is the second-leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. State public health programs could screen nearly eight times as many individuals and prevent nearly twice as many CRC cases by using fecal immunochemical testing, or FIT, instead of colonoscopies, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Many Women Receive Unnecessary Pap Tests
HBNS STORY | September 30, 2014
As many as half to two-thirds of women who’ve undergone hysterectomies or are older than 65 years report receiving Pap tests for cervical cancer, despite recommendations against it, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Only Half of U.S. Adults Over 45 Are Screened for Diabetes
HBNS STORY | September 25, 2014
A new cross-sectional study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that only half of adults in the U.S. were screened for diabetes within the last three years, less than what is recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA).

Online Social Networking Linked to Use of Web for Health Info
HBNS STORY | September 16, 2014
The use of social networking sites like Facebook may have implications for accessing online health information, finds a new longitudinal study from the Journal of Health Communication.

Sexual Risk Behaviors of Hispanic Youth Vary by Language, Place of Birth
HBNS STORY | September 2, 2014
A new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health finds that the sexual risk behaviors of young Hispanic people living in the U.S. vary considerably with their degree of acculturation.

Mental Health Screening in Primary Care Helps Veterans
HBNS STORY | August 12, 2014
Veterans who receive mental health screening during primary care visits are generally getting adequate follow-up treatment, but the process for acquiring care could be improved, finds a new study in General Hospital Psychiatry.

Cervical Cancer Prevention Program Saves Lives
HBNS STORY | July 15, 2014
A federal screening program markedly reduced death and illness from cervical cancer in underserved, low-income women but reached just 10 percent of the likely eligible population, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Public Health Centers Deliver Equal or Better Quality of Care
HBNS STORY | April 28, 2014
A new study in Health Services Research reports that patients who get care at federally funded health centers have fewer office visits and hospitalizations, and receive similar or a better quality of preventive care when compared to similar patients of non-health center primary care providers.

Simple Waiting Room Test Can Help Diagnose Depression and Anxiety
HBNS STORY | February 25, 2014
A new study in General Hospital Psychiatry finds patients visiting the hospital for a variety of ailments can be easily screened for depression and anxiety as they wait for care.

Health Inequalities Seen in Gays and Lesbians
HBNS STORY | February 11, 2014
People who identify as homosexual have several health disparities relative to their heterosexual peers, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Significant Economic Losses When Young Women Die From Breast Cancer
HBNS STORY | December 12, 2013
In 2008, breast cancer deaths in women under age 50 cost the economy $5.49 billion in productivity and resulted in an estimated 7.98 million years of potential life lost, finds a study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Massachusetts Residents Healthier After Health Care Reform
HBNS STORY | December 12, 2013
Residents of Massachusetts saw small gains in health status following the enactment of a state-wide health insurance mandate in 2006, finds a new study in the Milbank Quarterly.

Race a Bigger Health Care Barrier Than Insurance Status
HBNS STORY | November 7, 2013
Blacks, Hispanics and Asians are less likely than non-Hispanic Whites to visit a health care professional, even with health insurance, finds a recent study in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved.

Women in Appalachia Have Higher Rates of Late Stage Breast Cancer
HBNS STORY | September 26, 2013
Older women living in the most deprived areas of the U.S. Appalachia had higher rates of late stage breast cancer than women in more affluent areas, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Cancer Survivors Not Receiving Preventive Care
HBNS STORY | August 6, 2013
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that some cancer survivors do not always have the best access to primary care and that the type of health insurance they have—or don’t have—may be a factor.

Unemployment Linked to Reduced Use of Preventive Health Care
HBNS STORY | July 23, 2013
Fluctuations in the unemployment rate affect people’s health care choices, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Men Say They Want Prostate Cancer Test, Despite Risks
HBNS STORY | July 9, 2013
A survey of men age 40 to 74 found that 54 percent said that they would still opt for a popular prostate cancer screening test despite recent recommendations that the test not be performed, finds a new study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Emergency Departments Still Missing Signs of Pelvic Disease in Teens
HBNS STORY | June 13, 2013
Despite government efforts to expand diagnostic criteria for pelvic inflammatory disease, ER doctors are not identifying the condition any more often in adolescent girls, finds a new study in Journal of Adolescent Health.

Doctors Don’t Provide Sexual Health Info to Teens
HBNS STORY | June 11, 2013
Most sexually active teens don’t get information about sexual health from their health care providers, finds a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Screening Decisions Are Better Informed When Risk Information Is Personalized
HBNS STORY | February 28, 2013
Patients’ ability to make genuinely informed choices about undergoing disease screening increases when the risk information that they receive is related to their own personal risk, rather than average risks, according to the results of a Cochrane systematic review.

Half of At-Risk Older Adults Aren’t Getting Routine HIV Screening
HBNS STORY | January 29, 2013
Almost half of older adults visiting a public health clinic where HIV/AIDS was prevalent were not screened for the disease in the past 12 months, finds a study in The Gerontologist.

Decision Aids Sway More to Get Screened for Colon Cancer
HBNS STORY | November 6, 2012
People who are given tools to help them decide whether to have a colorectal cancer screening test are more are likely to request the procedure, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Even With Personalized Assessments, Many Underestimate Disease Risks
HBNS STORY | September 11, 2012
People with a family history of certain diseases, including heart disease and diabetes, often underestimate their risk for developing them, even after completing a risk assessment and receiving personalized prevention messages, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Three Fears May Discourage Colorectal Cancer Screening
HBNS STORY | April 30, 2012
New research about why people forego colorectal cancer (CRC) screening suggests that three fears play a significant role; fear of embarrassment, fear of getting AIDS and fear of pain may make some seniors skip the potentially lifesaving tests.

Doctors in U.S. Overuse Pap Smears
HBNS STORY | March 20, 2012
A new study finds U.S. physicians are performing Pap smears far more often than needed to prevent cervical cancer.

For Diabetics Not on Insulin, Self-Monitoring Blood Sugar Has No Benefit
HBNS STORY | January 19, 2012
For type 2 diabetics who are not on insulin, monitoring their blood sugar does little to control blood sugar levels over time and may not be worth the effort or expense, according to a new evidence review in The Cochrane Library.

Recommended Services Not Always Given During Patients’ Annual Exams
HBNS STORY | January 17, 2012
New research finds that patients may not always receive all of the screening tests and counseling services that are due during their medical checkups, according to a study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Mammogram Rates Lower for Mexican Women in U.S.
HBNS STORY | December 20, 2011
Mexican women in the United States are less likely to get mammograms than white women, black women and other Latinas, according to a new study in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

Racial Disparities in Colon Cancer Screening Persist Despite Insurance, Access
HBNS STORY | December 12, 2011
Public health researchers have long attributed the disparity in colonoscopy rates between whites and minorities to a lack of health insurance or access to doctors. Now, a new study in the journal Health Services Research suggests the reasons for the differences are more complex.

Routine Follow-up Mammography Benefits Breast Cancer Survivors
HBNS STORY | September 28, 2011
After breast cancer surgery, a follow-up regimen that includes regular mammograms offers a survival benefit over a follow-up regimen that does not include mammograms, according to a new systematic review.

Young Adults, Teens Prefer Rapid HIV Testing
HBNS STORY | May 17, 2011
Teens and young adults prefer rapid HIV testing that can deliver results in less than an hour, but some still worry about whether their tests will be confidential.

When Doctors Own or Lease MRI, Back Scans and Surgery More Likely
HBNS STORY | April 26, 2011
When doctors can self-refer for MRI, patients are more apt to receive scans – and even surgery – for low back pain.

Programs Help More Blacks Get Needed Colorectal Cancer Screening
HBNS STORY | October 29, 2010
African-Americans are less likely than whites to be screened for colorectal cancer, and the disparity almost certainly contributes to higher mortality. A new review of studies identifies effective strategies for improving the situation, but suggests that work remains to be done.

More People Get Health Screenings When Deductibles Are Waived
HBNS STORY | October 15, 2010

Large Gap in Diabetes, Obesity Screening Among U.S. Health Clinics
HBNS STORY | June 22, 2010