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Physician Behaviors May Contribute to Disparities in Mental Health Care
HBNS STORY | December 3, 2014
The way medical doctors initially assess, treat and refer racial and ethnic minority patients may contribute to known disparities in their use of mental health services, according to a new study in Health Services Research.

Some Psychiatric Patients Are More Frequent Users of Hospital ERs
HBNS STORY | November 13, 2014
New research in General Hospital Psychiatry finds that homelessness, cocaine use, being on Medicare, having a personality disorder or having liver disease appears to be a predictor of frequent ED use by people with a psychiatric illness.

Health Care Shortfalls for LGBT Young Women
HBNS STORY | October 28, 2014
Young sexual minority women, including those identifying as lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT), were found to have higher elevated odds of adverse health conditions than heterosexual young women. They also have lower odds of receiving a physical or dental examination, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Nationality at Birth Plays a Role in U.S. Adult Vaccination Rates
HBNS STORY | October 14, 2014
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that foreign-born adult U.S. residents, who make up about 13 percent of the population, receive vaccinations at significantly lower rates than U.S.-born adults. This gap in care puts them at greater risk of exposure to several vaccine-preventable diseases.

Expanding Medicaid Increases Rural Health Care Access and Use
HBNS STORY | October 2, 2014
A new study in Health Services Research reveals that expanding Medicaid to cover more adults boosts health care access and use in rural populations.

Only Half of U.S. Adults Over 45 Are Screened for Diabetes
HBNS STORY | September 25, 2014
A new cross-sectional study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that only half of adults in the U.S. were screened for diabetes within the last three years, less than what is recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA).

Online Social Networking Linked to Use of Web for Health Info
HBNS STORY | September 16, 2014
The use of social networking sites like Facebook may have implications for accessing online health information, finds a new longitudinal study from the Journal of Health Communication.

Poor Health Habits Linked to Financial Insecurity
HBNS STORY | September 4, 2014
Financial hardship, or feeling that one can’t make ends meet, may be more predictive of health risk behaviors than actual income levels for people with low-incomes, finds a recent study in the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Inadequate Mental Health Care for Blacks with Depression and Diabetes, High Blood Pressure
HBNS STORY | July 24, 2014
A new study in General Hospital Psychiatry confirms that Blacks with depression plus another chronic medical condition, such as Type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure, do not receive adequate mental health treatment.

Cervical Cancer Prevention Program Saves Lives
HBNS STORY | July 15, 2014
A federal screening program markedly reduced death and illness from cervical cancer in underserved, low-income women but reached just 10 percent of the likely eligible population, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

When It Comes to Health Disparities, Place Matters More Than Race
HBNS STORY | July 17, 2014
Blacks and Whites living in an integrated, low-income urban area had similar rates of treatment and management of hypertension, or high blood pressure, finds a new study in Ethnicity & Disease.

Little Progress Made in Reducing Health Disparities for People with Disabilities
HBNS STORY | June 26, 2014
Mental distress in people with disabilities is associated with increased prevalence of chronic illness and reduced access to health care and preventive care services, finds a new study in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved.

Growing Up Poor Impacts Physical and Mental Health in Young Adults
HBNS STORY | June 24, 2014
Socioeconomic adversity during childhood increases the likelihood of both depression and higher body mass index (BMI) in early adolescence, which can worsen and lead to illness for young adults, according to a new report in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Class and Insurance Stigma Are Barriers to Good Health Care
HBNS STORY | June 19, 2014
Some low-income, uninsured and Medicaid patients report feeling stigma when interacting with health care providers, finds a new report in The Milbank Quarterly.

Shared Decision Making Missing in Cancer Screening Discussions
HBNS STORY | June 12, 2014
A national survey of patients reveals that physicians don’t always fully discuss the risks and benefits of cancer screening, reports a new study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

People with Low Incomes Less Likely to Use Healthy Weight Loss Strategies
HBNS STORY | May 22, 2014
Poorer people of all ages are less likely than wealthier ones to follow recommended strategies for weight loss, finds a recent study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Low Self-Rating of Social Status Predicts Heart Disease Risk
HBNS STORY | May 6, 2014
How a person defines their own socioeconomic standing (SES) within their community can help predict their risk of cardiovascular disease, but only among Whites, not Blacks, finds a recent study in Ethnicity and Disease.

Minorities Face Disparities in Treatment and Outcomes of Atrial Fibrillation
HBNS STORY | April 29, 2014
Minority patients with atrial fibrillation, a heart condition that increases the risk of stroke, were less likely to receive common treatments and more likely to die from the condition than their white counterparts, finds a new study in Ethnicity and Disease.

Double Discrimination Impacts Physical and Mental Health
HBNS STORY | March 25, 2014
Racial and sexual minorities, women, and obese people may face more health risks because of their disproportionate exposure to discrimination, according to a new report in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Better Benefits Help Medicaid Recipients Quit Smoking
HBNS STORY | March 6, 2014
Expanded smoking cessation benefits offered under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) should give more people the opportunity to quit, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Health Inequalities Seen in Gays and Lesbians
HBNS STORY | February 11, 2014
People who identify as homosexual have several health disparities relative to their heterosexual peers, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Men, Elderly, Minorities Not Getting Treated for Depression
HBNS STORY | February 6, 2014
Depression rates are increasing in the U.S. and under-treatment is widespread, especially among certain groups including men, the poor, the elderly and ethnic minorities, finds a new study in General Hospital Psychiatry.

Gap in Life Expectancy Between Rural and Urban Residents Is Growing
HBNS STORY | January 23, 2014
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that rural residents have experienced smaller gains in life expectancy than their urban counterparts and the gap continues to grow.

Sedentary Lifestyles Up Mortality Risks for Older Women
HBNS STORY | January 21, 2014
Older women who spend a majority of their day sitting or lying down are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, cancer and death, finds a new study from the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Hospitals Serving Elderly Poor More Likely to Be Penalized for Readmissions
HBNS STORY | January 7, 2014
Hospitals that treat more poor seniors who are on both Medicaid and Medicare tend to have higher rates of readmissions, triggering costly penalties, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Minorities and Poor More Likely to Suffer from Restless Sleep and Chronic Diseases
HBNS STORY | December 17, 2013
The poor and minorities tend to suffer from poor sleep and chronic disease more often, but sleep does not appear to be a root cause of disease disparity, finds a new study in Ethnicity & Disease.

Immigration Status Impacts Health, Especially for the Young
HBNS STORY | December 10, 2013
Age at immigration and citizenship status may have health implications for immigrants, finds a new study in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Unique Barriers for African Americans With High Blood Pressure
HBNS STORY | November 26, 2013
African Americans with high blood pressure who reported experiencing racial discrimination had lower rates of adherence to their blood pressure medication, finds a new study in the American Journal of Public Health.

Cuts to Local Health Departments Hurt Communities
HBNS STORY | November 14, 2013
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that many local health departments aren’t able to meet goals to increase health care access.

Race a Bigger Health Care Barrier Than Insurance Status
HBNS STORY | November 7, 2013
Blacks, Hispanics and Asians are less likely than non-Hispanic Whites to visit a health care professional, even with health insurance, finds a recent study in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved.

Lifestyle Behaviors Key to Post-Deployment Health of Veterans
HBNS STORY | October 31, 2013
A new study in the American Journal of Health Promotion finds that the lifestyle of veterans both pre- and post-deployment influences their post-deployment wellness.

Healthy Food Rarely Convenient for Urban Minorities
HBNS STORY | October 15, 2013
A survey of stores in a predominantly black, low income area of Philadelphia found that nearly 80 percent received low ratings for the availability of healthy food, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

More Education, Not Income, Fights Obesity
HBNS STORY | September 12, 2013
Higher education, rather than income, protects women in disadvantaged neighborhoods from obesity, finds a new study in American Journal of Health Promotion.

Women in Appalachia Have Higher Rates of Late Stage Breast Cancer
HBNS STORY | September 26, 2013
Older women living in the most deprived areas of the U.S. Appalachia had higher rates of late stage breast cancer than women in more affluent areas, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Rural Seniors Prefer Self-Care Over Doctors
HBNS STORY | August 15, 2013
A survey of older rural adults found a high degree of medical skepticism, the belief that one knows and can control their own health better than a medical professional can, reports a recent study in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved.

Cancer Survivors Not Receiving Preventive Care
HBNS STORY | August 6, 2013
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that some cancer survivors do not always have the best access to primary care and that the type of health insurance they have—or don’t have—may be a factor.

Obesity Is a Major Obstacle for Disabled Americans
HBNS STORY | July 16, 2013
Obesity and its related health problems impacts far more people with a disability than previously reported, according to new research in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Hispanic and Black Kids Less Likely to Use Medication to Control Asthma
HBNS STORY | June 27, 2013
Black and Hispanic children with asthma are less likely than White children to use long-term asthma control medications, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Nursing Homes with More Black Residents Do Poorly
HBNS STORY | June 25, 2013
Nursing homes with higher proportions of Black residents do worse financially and deliver lower-quality care than nursing homes with few or no Black residents, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Breast Cancer Treatments Delayed for Black and Rural Women
HBNS STORY | May 21, 2013
Black women with breast cancer are more likely than Hispanic or white women to experience delays in the initiation of chemotherapy or radiation after surgery, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Predominately Black Hospitals Provide Poor Trauma Care
HBNS STORY | May 16, 2013
Victims of trauma are at higher risk of either dying or suffering a major complication if they are treated at a hospital that serves a large population of black patients, finds a large new study in Health Services Research.

Credit Card Debt Leads Some to Skip Medical Care
HBNS STORY | April 25, 2013
People with outstanding credit card or medical debt were more likely to delay or avoid medical or dental care, finds a new study in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Birthing Centers Provide Equal or Better Deliveries
HBNS STORY | April 18, 2013
Low-income women who chose to deliver their baby at a birthing center under the care of a certified nurse-midwife had the same or better birthing experience as women under traditional care with a hospital-based obstetrician, according to a new study in Health Services Research.

Churches Minister Better Health in African American Communities
HBNS STORY | April 9, 2013
African Americans who believe their church is responsible for promoting health in their members and the community are also more willing to attend church-based health fairs, according to a new study in Health Promotion Practice.

Elderly Women in Rural Areas Less Likely to Recover from Depression
HBNS STORY | March 19, 2013
Being female and living in a rural area are among several factors that predicted whether an elderly person with depression recovered over the course of a year, finds a recent study in Depression Research and Treatment.

Email and Texts to Doctors: Not Just for High-Income Patients
HBNS STORY | March 12, 2013
Low-income patients served by “safety-net” community health centers want to communicate with their doctors via email or text or are already doing so, according to a new study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Housing Improvements Should Be Targeted at Those in Poorest Health
HBNS STORY | March 5, 2013
Improving housing can improve health, particularly when interventions are targeted at those in the poorest health, according to a systematic review published in The Cochrane Library.

States that Support Access to Health Information Can Decrease Colon Cancer Deaths
HBNS STORY | September 25, 2012
Despite medical advances in colon cancer screening and treatment, people with a lower socioeconomic status remain at a higher risk of dying from colon cancer. A new study in The Milbank Quarterly finds that states and communities that focus on increasing the adoption of innovative health care practices along with providing greater access to public health information can reduce these deaths.

Diagnostic Confidence Key for Prompt Treatment for Women with Heart Symptoms
HBNS STORY | August 29, 2012
Doctors who believe that women have “atypical” coronary heart disease symptoms are less certain when diagnosing heart disease in women. As a result, women are less likely than men to receive treatments for an urgent cardiac event, finds a new study in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Even With Insurance, Racial Disparities in Breast Cancer Treatment Persist
HBNS STORY | July 26, 2012
A new study in Ethnicity & Disease finds that racial disparities in breast cancer treatment persist even when Black and White patients have the same Medicaid health insurance and similar economic status.

Predominately Black-Serving Hospitals Provide Poorer Care
HBNS STORY | July 19, 2012
Hospitals that mostly serve Black patients have worse mortality outcomes for both Black and White patients with three common conditions: heart attack, congestive heart failure or pneumonia. The new study in Health Services Research suggests that there is an urgent need to improve care at predominately black-serving institutions.

Mental Health Care Disparities Persist for Black and Latino Children
HBNS STORY | June 21, 2012
Disparities in the use of mental health services, including outpatient care and psychotropic drug prescriptions, persist for black and Latino children, reports a new study in Health Services Research.

Women and Minorities Face Barriers to Clinical Trials
HBNS STORY | June 1, 2012
Physicians have great influence over whether minorities and women participate in cancer clinical trials, according to a new literature review.

'Health Care Deserts' More Common In Black Neighborhoods
HBNS STORY | April 25, 2012
New research into "health care deserts" finds that primary-care physicians are especially hard to find in predominantly Black and/or low-income Hispanic metropolitan neighborhoods.

Even Outside “Stroke Belt,” African-Americans Face Higher Mortality
HBNS STORY | September 1, 2011
African-Americans and country folk outside the so-called “stroke belt” are at higher risk for stroke death than other populations, a large new study finds.

Unaffordable Housing Might Lead to Poor Health
HBNS STORY | November 9, 2010
People who cannot afford their housing are more likely to suffer from poor health, according to a new study, which also found that renters consider themselves less healthy than homeowners.

Canada, US Immigrants Have Less Health Care Access Than Natives
HBNS STORY | September 2, 2010

Hmong-American Women Far Less Likely to Get Pap Test
HBNS STORY | August 5, 2010

WIC Program Has Moderate Effect on Birth Outcomes
HBNS STORY | April 28, 2010
A new study that looked at the effect of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) to determine the effect on various birth outcomes found that the overall effects were only moderate.

Report: Too Few Minority Doctors After Decades of Discrimination
HBNS STORY | January 27, 2010