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Not just about Mom and Dad's Health Insurance...
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | April 6, 2010 | Trudy Lieberman
In the past two weeks I have visited two college campuses---one in Brooklyn and one in Wisconsin.' Large numbers of students turned out to hear about the new reform law and wanted to know what it meant for them.'

How Safe Is Your Insurance, Really?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | April 19, 2010 | Trudy Lieberman
Throughout the long debate over health reform, the president told us if we liked the insurance we had, we could keep it.' No government would come between us and our health coverage!'

Can You Really Choose the Best?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | April 29, 2010 | Trudy Lieberman

Employment and Insurance: No Guarantee for Better Health
HBNS STORY | April 30, 2010

Access to Health Insurance Is Just a Start
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | May 7, 2010 | Kalahn Taylor Clark
In May 2009, my 61 year old mother, who lives in Maine, was diagnosed with Stage 3 Breast Cancer. My proud mother worked hard every day of her life as a cleaning person to provide me the best education, often bartering with clients so that she could provide dental or eye care or other services for me while I was growing up.

Out-of-Pocket Costs Put Arthritis Drugs Out of Reach for Some
HBNS STORY | May 20, 2010

Will You Be Helped by the New High-Risk Health Pools?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | May 26, 2010 | Trudy Lieberman
The new health reform law is what I like to call an 'over-the-line proposition' because undoubtedly, someone is going to be left out. ' What passed the Congress will not bring universal health coverage to America; nor does it assure that everyone is entitled to health care as a matter of right.' It simply adds more people to the current system by giving them subsidies to buy insurance they couldn't otherwise afford.' In such a system, there will always be people over the line'they won't qualify for this subsidy or that program either because the government limits its spending on them, or it wants to encourage people to use private insurance to keep those markets strong.

Latinas Delay Seeking Care, Even if Insured and Ill
HBNS STORY | June 3, 2010

What Happens When COBRA Disappears?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | June 4, 2010 | Trudy Lieberman
For thousands of laid-off Americans who have been relying on COBRA for their health insurance the past several months, Friday brought some bad news. In an effort to trim the deficit, the House voted to drop an extension of COBRA benefits that would have given displaced workers coverage until the end of the year. That would have cost the government nearly $8 billion. The Senate will vote on the issue next week.

Is Choosing a Health Plan Like Buying a Car or Canned Goods?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | June 21, 2010 | Trudy Lieberman
Do consumers buy health insurance like they buy canned peas? Or should they? That's the big question market place advocates have been trying to answer now for more than a decade. The government and others have thrown gobs of money at this vexing problem trying to figure out the best combination of stars, bars and other symbols that will catch the shopper's eye.

What Happens When an Insurance Company Misbehaves
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | July 12, 2010 | Trudy Lieberman
When the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) took the rare step this spring of kicking Fox Insurance out of the Medicare Part D drug benefit program, it pretty much went unnoticed. CMS went after Fox, admittedly small fry in the pool of insurers, and said they couldn't sell any more stand-alone prescription drug plans to seniors These plans are the kind that people buy to complement Medigap policies that don't offer any drug coverage.

Paying to Participate
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | July 14, 2010 | Goldie Pyka

Keeping an Eye on Insurance Rate Hikes
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | July 29, 2010 | Trudy Lieberman

For Parents of Uninsured Kids, a Little Help Goes a Long Way
HBNS STORY | August 7, 2010

More People Choosing Consumer-Directed Health Plans---Pitfalls and All
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | August 9, 2010 | Trudy Lieberman

Sorting Through the Indecipherable 'Explanation of Benefits' Is Becoming a Required Skill
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | August 16, 2010 | Trudy Lieberman
A young friend showed me her Explanation of Benefits from Empire Blue Cross Blue Shield. "I don't really understand it," she said. This woman has a master's degree from the London School of Economics but couldn't comprehend what her insurance carrier was telling her...

Matt Seeks Health Insurance: A Young Adult Falls Through the Cracks of Health Reform
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | August 26, 2010 | Trudy Lieberman

A New Way for Hospitals to Make a Little Extra'Tax the Sick
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | September 8, 2010 | Trudy Lieberman
Dianne Cooper Bridges, a feisty health reform activist in Massachusetts, recently found herself in the hospital for a routine consultation with no tests or procedures. Because Bridges, a self-employed designer, refuses to buy the required health insurance in her state, she has no insurance and occasionally pays a fine. That means she shops carefully for medical care, which she pays for in cash. When she called the University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center and asked how much her consultation would be, the hospital quoted her a price between $100 and $200.

Healthy, Educated Employees More Likely to Pick High-Deductible Plan
HBNS STORY | September 16, 2010

Matt Seeks Health Insurance, Part 2: The Runaround Continues
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | September 24, 2010 | Trudy Lieberman

Adding an Adult Son or Daughter to Your Insurance
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | September 30, 2010 | Trudy Lieberman

Selecting Health Insurance? Help from Around the Web:
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | October 13, 2010 | CFAH Staff
In his most recent blog, "How to Pick Good Health Insurance - Your Life Depends on It," Dr. Davis Liu emphasizes how important is it for us to evaluate carefully our health insurance plans. Liu points out that, unlike other companies or products whose efficacy may impact our lives modestly ' your car wash, dry cleaners and choice of movie theater ' the ranking of your health insurance plan relative to others impacts your life greatly. And not all health plans are created equal.

Revisiting Those Puzzling EOBs: New York Penalizes Aetna
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | October 14, 2010 | Trudy Lieberman

More People Get Health Screenings When Deductibles Are Waived
HBNS STORY | October 15, 2010

Who's Afraid Of The Big Bad Blues And Why
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | October 21, 2010 | Jim Jaffe
Some broad questions about how bad it is to be big are raised by the government's new antitrust suit against Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, which allegedly used its market dominance to force hospitals to charge other insurers a third more than the insurance giant paid. One can see how this could help the nonprofit Blues control the market, but it is difficult to determine how this was in the public interest ' or even advantageous to those it was covering.

What You Need to Know About Your Health Insurance Policy
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | October 29, 2010 | Trudy Lieberman
Federal and state government officials and their opponents in the insurance industry have been busy as beavers these days chewing on that perennially vexing problem: how to disclose insurance information so consumers will be wise shoppers. Since we have a market-based model of health insurance, that's not a frivolous question. What works best, what doesn't, and what do consumers acting as shoppers really care about?

Inside Health Care: Dichotomies: Quality or Familiarity? Empower or Manage?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | November 8, 2010 | Inside Health Care

Does Long-Term Care Insurance Have a Future?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | November 23, 2010 | Trudy Lieberman
The decision by Metropolitan Life to stop selling long-term care (LTC) insurance once again calls into question the viability of that product as a way to pay for nursing home, assisted living and home care needed by the growing number of elders. MetLife was a solid company'big and reputable, with a knack for selling policies to workers whose employers offered the coverage as an extra benefit. It was a name that people trusted in an industry characterized by many small sellers, some of whom became insolvent.

Assessing Your Risk: Buying a Policy That Doesn't Cover Much
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | December 2, 2010 | Trudy Lieberman
My friend Ariane Canas, a New York City hairdresser, was eager to tell me about a new health insurance policy she had come across. It was cheap very cheap as such coverage goes. I knew that she and her husband, who is also self-employed, had gotten a notice this fall from their current carrier advising of a 33 percent rate increase.

Health Reform: Elections, Politics and Patients
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | December 14, 2010 | Lisa Esposito
Health care reform is a hot topic with yesterday's court ruling that a portion of the Affordable Care Act is unconstitutional.

Mini-Med Policies: Is the Government Telling Us Something We Don't Already Know?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | December 17, 2010 | Trudy Lieberman
The new health reform bureaucracy at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has announced that it will now require employers, health insurers and union welfare benefit funds to disclose to policy holders that the health insurance they have may not be real health insurance at all. They now have to tell us if their coverage does not meet minimum benefit standards required by law and by how much they fall short. So those who have mini-med policies will now get a notice telling them that their policies cover very little. As if people don't already know.

Assessing Risk: Medicare Advantage vs. Medigap vs. Drug Coverage Only
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | December 22, 2010 | Trudy Lieberman
As Medicare's open enrollment season draws to a close, it's a good bet that seniors are still sifting through all those brochures and flyers that have come in the mail the last several weeks. My husband received 22. Here's a simple rule to make the sifting go a little faster.

Dicker With Your Doc? Not So Fast'
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | January 20, 2011 | Jessie Gruman
'How to Haggle With Your Doctor' was the title of a recent Business section column in The New York Times. This is one of many similar directives to the public in magazines, TV and Websites urging us to lower the high price of our health care by going mano a mano with our physicians about the price of tests they recommend and the drugs they prescribe. Such articles provide simple, commonsense recommendations about how to respond to the urgency many of us feel ' insured or uninsured ' to reduce our health care expenses.

When You Have an Insurance Dispute
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | January 24, 2011 | Jennifer Jaff
While access to health insurance is a critical component of finding good care and making the most of it, being insured is often just the starting point for frequent users of health care services.

Vanishing Health Care Choices
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | February 16, 2011 | Trudy Lieberman
Ask someone what he or she remembers Obama promising during the great health reform debates, and the response might be: 'We can keep the insurance we have.' The president did offer assurances that there would be no socialized medicine with the government dictating where you could go for care. He did not mention, though, that many insured people already have little say in what kind of coverage they get and who can treat them.

How the Cost of Health Care Creeps Up and Up
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | March 1, 2011 | Trudy Lieberman
In a previous post, I talked about what happens when a radiology practice goes digital for mammography, even though there's scant evidence that more-expensive digital is better than cheaper film for detecting cancer in older women. Yet the higher-priced costly procedure is winning out. That's pretty much the norm for U.S. health care, for instance, when ThinPrep replaced the conventional method for doing Pap smears. I used to pay $9 for the test; the one I had last summer cost $250.

How Code Creep Boosts the Price of Health Care
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | March 22, 2011 | Trudy Lieberman
About 30 years ago I had my first run-in with code creep. A urologist I had visited for a garden-variety urinary tract infection billed $400 to determine that this was what I had. The price seemed excessive, and then I looked at the bill. The good doctor has 'unbundled' his services. He charged for every single thing he did'inserting a catheter, taking a urine sample, writing a prescription and finally adding a fee for a general office visit. I had thought all those things were part of the office visit. I protested. He reduced his charges, and I never went back.

Health Reform Predicted to Increase Need for Primary Care Providers
HBNS STORY | March 24, 2011
Expansion of health care coverage mandated by health reform will push demand for primary care providers sharply upward, and thousands of new physicians are needed to accommodate the increase, a new study finds.

Conversation Continues: Young Adults and The Affordable Care Act
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | June 17, 2011 | CFAH Staff
Sara Collins of the Commonwealth Fund and veteran health care journalist Trudy Lieberman look at how the Affordable Care Act is and is not helping young adults stay covered.

Health Insurance Doesn’t Always Protect People From Medical Debt
HBNS STORY | June 30, 2011
A new study confirms that having health insurance coverage is no guarantee against accumulating medical debt for working-age adults.

'Is a Cheaper, Effective Option Available?' An Important Question to Ask
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | July 18, 2011 | Conversation Continues
The Costs of Care blog, "Hidden Costs of Medication", reinforces the importance of asking, 'How expensive is this treatment?" and "Is a less expensive option available?'

When the Insurance Company Says 'No'
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | August 12, 2011 | Trudy Lieberman
Blue Cross just advised a twenty-six-year old woman I know that it will cut off payments for the physical therapy that was making it possible for her to sit at a keyboard for eleven hours a day. Her thirty sessions were up.

Health Insurance, Meet the Jolly Green Giant
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | August 31, 2011 | Trudy Lieberman
It's official now. The government has proposed that descriptions of health insurance policies will resemble those nutritional labels on canned and packaged foods'the ones you look at to find out how much sodium there is in Birds Eye peas versus the A&P brand.

Turning 65: A Medicare Snafu
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | September 13, 2011 | Trudy Lieberman
I didn't expect to write a sequel to my seven-part series about signing up for Medicare. Just when I thought I was on the program, and all was fine, it wasn't. After I submitted two bills for routine exams, I learned Medicare would not cover them as my primary carrier. That threw me into a tizzy. All my years of reporting about the program taught me that once you retire Medicare is primary.

Cigna's New Ad Campaign Aims to Snag New Customers
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | September 27, 2011 | Trudy Lieberman
Cigna launched a $25 million 'GO YOU' national branding campaign last week signaling that they are gearing up for tons of new customers as health reform rolls towards 2014. That new business will come from the millions of Americans now uninsured who will start getting government subsidies as an encouragement to buy health insurance coverage.

Guest Blog: Price Tags and Haggling in an Exotic Market
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | September 29, 2011 | Daniela Carusi
While shopping in a market on an exotic trip, a friend of mine picked up an appealing item, but the price seemed high. When she paused to consider the purchase, the shopkeeper asked, 'Don't you want to know if I can do better?' But with health care, we can't predict what the final negotiated payment will be without knowing who is paying and what kind of bargaining position that person is in.

Health Reform Loopholes
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | October 13, 2011 | Trudy Lieberman
A couple weeks ago I walked the streets of Lincoln, Nebraska, talking to men and women about whether they thought Washington was listening to their economic concerns. Jeff Melichar manages his family's Phillips 66 gas station on the city's main street, and one of his big financial problems happens to be health insurance.

Lack of Health Insurance Linked to Fewer Asthma Diagnoses in Children
HBNS STORY | October 27, 2011
Providing health insurance to more children could lead to diagnosing additional cases of mild or intermittent asthma, a new study shows. Some who treat childhood asthma say this could increase the number of kids receiving medication to control their asthma symptoms and seeking care for asthma flares.

The Rocky Adolescence of Public Reporting on Health Care Quality: It's Not Useful Yet, and We're Not Ready
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | November 9, 2011 | Jessie Gruman
The American people, long protected from the price of health care by insurance, are now forced to act as consumers. This situation is a free marketer's dream.

What's the Price on That MRI? Patients and the Price of Health Care
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | November 23, 2011 | Jessie Gruman
A couple of weeks ago, I was asked to speak as a patient about 'consumers and cost information' while being videotaped for use in the annual meeting of the Aligning Forces for Quality initiative funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Here's what I had to say.

Racial Disparities in Colon Cancer Screening Persist Despite Insurance, Access
HBNS STORY | December 12, 2011
Public health researchers have long attributed the disparity in colonoscopy rates between whites and minorities to a lack of health insurance or access to doctors. Now, a new study in the journal Health Services Research suggests the reasons for the differences are more complex.

Revisiting Those Explanations of Benefits
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | January 19, 2012 | Trudy Lieberman
Katie Ryan-Anderson, a health reporter at the Jamestown Sun in Jamestown, North Dakota, had a question. What did all that gobbledygook on the Explanation of Benefits (EOBs) from Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Dakota mean?

Guest Blog: 10 Sex Tips for Better Looking Health Insurance
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | January 23, 2012 | Michael Millenson
It's always interesting to watch health reform concepts move from policy shops and peer-reviewed papers into the mainstream. Provider report cards have surfaced in venues as diverse as Martha Stewart Living and The Examiner, a supermarket tabloid that promised to reveal 'America's 50 Best Hospitals.'

Cash Rewards from Your Health Plan
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | January 30, 2012 | Trudy Lieberman
Harvard Pilgrim Health Care has moved deeper into the business of transforming health care into a commodity governed by the rules of the marketplace. Plan members can get cash rewards'.if they use facilities for outpatient medical procedures and diagnostic testing recommended by the health plan, not their doctors.

We Are All Health Illiterates: Navigating the Health System in a Sea of Paper and Financial Haze
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | February 2, 2012 | Jane Sarasohn Kahn
Health literacy isn't just about understanding clinical directions for self-care, such as how to take medications prescribed by a doctor, or how to change a bandage and clean an infected area. It's also about how to effectively navigate one's health system'and that skill is in short-supply'

What Consumers Don't Know About Their Health Insurance
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | February 7, 2012 | Trudy Lieberman
On a chilly New York day, a sales agent for UnitedHealthcare stood on a noisy street corner in Spanish Harlem pushing Medicare Advantage (MA) plans. He was engaging in table marketing a way to snag new customers, converts from other MA plans, he hoped.

Even Small Increases in Copays Affect Use of Children's Healthcare
HBNS STORY | February 17, 2012
Increases in copayments of only a few dollars for ALL Kids, Alabama's Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), led to declines in the use of several healthcare services for the children they affected, reveals a study in Health Services Research.

The Government Meets the Jolly Green Giant
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | February 21, 2012 | Trudy Lieberman
Labels describing key features of health insurance policies will become a reality this fall fulfilling a provision of the health reform law that called for more disclosure and transparency. The idea was to copy the labeling for food products'

The Supreme Court's Health Care Decision and Your Pocketbook
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | April 5, 2012 | Trudy Lieberman
Last week's drama at the Supreme Court and most of the media coverage that followed omitted crucial information: how a decision either upholding or junking the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will affect ordinary Americans. Because the health reform law is not well understood by most people, it's worth recapping what might happen.

Prepared Patient: How to Find and Use Health Insurance
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | April 5, 2012 | Health Behavior News Service
Several years ago, DeAnn Friedholm had to shop for her own health insurance. The prospective insurance company discovered she had had a couple of benign tumors more than a decade before and so denied her coverage because of her preexisting condition. Just like that, Friedholm had no good option for insurance in case she needed to see a doctor. Whether you are like DeAnn with a preexisting condition, are new to shopping for insurance or trying to figure out what coverage you do have, there are resources to help with this often complicated but important purchase.

What to Do About Long-Term Care Insurance
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | April 17, 2012 | Trudy Lieberman
The decision to buy long-term-care insurance and how long to keep it is among the toughest people make as health-care consumers. The product is difficult to buy'confusing, complicated, and costly.

'Death Panels': Beliefs and Disbeliefs in Health Care
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | May 23, 2012 | Trudy Lieberman
Virginia was particularly concerned that she would not get medical treatment after she turns 75. She had heard at that age, 'they send you a letter. They are going to start sending you literature on death.'

More Confusion about Those Insurance EOBs. This Time from Medicare
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | June 6, 2012 | Trudy Lieberman
People have a right to receive in plain language a summary of what doctors bill, what insurers pay and how much they themselves must pay.

A Recommendation to Minimize Costs Backfires
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | June 15, 2012 | Alexis Ball
My mom passed away last December to Stage V breast cancer metastasized to her liver. During this battle she developed ascites (an accumulation of fluid in the peritoneal cavity) as her liver failure progressed. This accumulation of fluid was not only extremely uncomfortable but painful as well.

Doctors Who Share Patients May Provide Lower Cost Care
HBNS STORY | July 31, 2012
Patients with diabetes or congestive heart failure who receive care from doctors with high levels of patient overlap have lower total health care costs and lower rates of hospitalization, according to a new study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

A Year of Living Sickishly: A Patient Reflects

On Friday afternoon of Labor Day weekend three years ago, my doctor called to tell me that the pathology report from a recent endoscopy showed that I had stomach cancer. Maybe you can imagine what happened next.

Guest Blog: Health Insurance Decisions Still Tough for Many
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | September 25, 2012 | Jane Sarasohn Kahn
Americans find health insurance decisions the second most difficult major life decision, only behind saving for retirement and slightly more difficult than purchasing a car. Why are health insurance choices so tough?

Slow Leaks: Missed Opportunities to Encourage Our Engagement in Our Health Care

What does it take for us and our families to find good care and make the most of it? And what can be done to help those who lack the skills, resources or capacities, or who are already ill, compensate for their inability to do so? This collection of essays identifies some of the key challenges posed to most of us by health care as it is currently delivered in many settings.

People Surprised by Costs of Out-of-Network Care
HBNS STORY | October 25, 2012
Forty percent of people who received health care outside of their insurance network did so out of necessity, finds a new study in Health Services Research. About half of those patients did not know how much they would have to pay for their out-of-network care.

Women Often Lose Their Health Insurance When Divorced
HBNS STORY | November 13, 2012
Each year, almost 115,000 women in the U.S. will lose their health insurance in the months following a divorce, finds a study in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Getting a Prescription Refill: Hassles from My Health Plan
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | November 27, 2012 | Val Jones
In a recent post entitled “The Joys of Health Insurance Bureaucracy” I described how it took me (a physician) over three months to get one common prescription filled through my new health insurance plan. Of note, I have still been unable to enroll in the prescription refill mail order service that saves my insurer money and (ostensibly) enhances my convenience.

Find Good Health Care
PREPARED PATIENT RESOURCE | Find Good Health Care
The quality of doctors and hospitals varies. Here is information to help you find the right care.

How to Find and Use Health Insurance
PREPARED PATIENT ARTICLE
Whether you have a preexisting condition or not, are new to shopping for insurance or trying to figure out what coverage you do have, there are resources to help with this often complicated but important purchase.

Pay for Your Health Care
PREPARED PATIENT RESOURCE | Pay for Your Health Care
Seek insurance and manage the worrisome chores of arranging and paying for care.

Finding a New Doctor
PREPARED PATIENT RESOURCE | Find Good Health Care
Choosing a doctor and building a relationship with him or her is an important first step to getting and staying healthy.
Here's advice on how to locate a new physician to make sure you get care that fits your needs.

Making Plans for Your End-of-Life Health Care
PREPARED PATIENT RESOURCE | Plan for Your End-of-Life Care
It’s important to make your wishes known to your family and doctors regarding treatment at the end-of-life. Here are resources to help you have this conversation.

Getting the Most Out of a Doctor’s Appointment
PREPARED PATIENT RESOURCE | Communicate With Your Doctors
Doctor’s appointments are often brief. Here’s how to quickly explain what’s wrong so you can get the help you need.

How Do You Tell Your Employer That You Are Sick?
PREPARED PATIENT RESOURCE | Organize Your Health Care
If you expect to miss work due to your or a loved one’s illness, here’s what to tell your employer.

Getting Your Operation at a Cut-Rate Surgery Center
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | January 29, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman
Consumerism in health care is coming to mean patients must shop around for the best price — for a doctor’s visit, Cipro, health insurance and maybe even your next operation.

Buying Health Care from a Boutique
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | February 20, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman
Somehow, I don’t think of money-back guarantees when I think about going to the doctor. Yet as textbook marketing principles creep into health care, a few medical providers are beginning to look like sellers of toothpaste and detergents.

Health Care Consumers Are Compromised By Complex Information
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | April 4, 2013 | Jane Sarasohn Kahn
Americans have embraced their role as consumers in virtually every aspect of life: making travel plans, trading stock, developing photos, and purchasing goods like cars and washing machines. That is, in every aspect of life but health care.

Unwilling to Pay Extra for Wellness
HBNS STORY | April 9, 2013
Although most overweight adults agree that health insurance benefits designed to promote weight loss are a good idea, they don’t want to pay extra for them, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Is Health Insurance Sticker Shock for Real?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | April 9, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman
Wherever you turn, there are complaints about health insurance rates. A Pennsylvania woman tells me her monthly premium will soon be $100 more than it used to be. A New Yorker finds the premium for retiree coverage rising 24 percent...

Is Health Care One Gigantic Consumer Problem?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | April 23, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman
One could easily make a case that health care is today’s biggest consumer problem—not unlike those that sparked the consumer movement of the 1960s and 70s. Back then, consumer issues centered on problems with using credit, buying cars and home improvement services, and obtaining the best price for food, appliances, and just about every other new-fangled and expensive product that sprang from the post-war economy.

Bad Language: Words One Patient Won't Use (and Hopes You Won't Either)
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | April 24, 2013 | Jessie Gruman
When I read Trudy Lieberman’s post yesterday, I was reminded that the highly charged political debates about reforming American health care have provided tempting opportunities to rename the people who receive health services. But because the impetus for this change has been prompted by cost and quality concerns of health care payers, researchers and policy experts rather than emanating from us out of our own needs, some odd words have been called into service.

Are We Finally Getting Closer to Price Transparency?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | May 8, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman
The revelations by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services on Wednesday that hospitals vary widely in what they “charge” for the same procedure—sometimes as much as 10 or 20 times more than Medicare reimburses—confirms what health policy wonks have known for a long time. There’s no consistency in pricing for health care services…

Rationing Medications
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | May 15, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman
In America, the conventional wisdom is that we don't ration health care. But we do, and there's no better example than patients rationing themselves when it comes to the medicines they take.

Are Health Insurance Rates Going Up or Down — A Cautionary Tale?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | June 12, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman
Will consumers buying coverage in the new state shopping exchanges find lower or higher rates? On one side are those who say the newly insured will see lower premiums for coverage.

Cheap Insurance Premiums Come at a Price
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | June 18, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman
Yesterday the blog of WIFR-TV in Rockford, Illinois, featured a small story about community groups in the state applying for federal grants to help educate customers coming to the new health exchange in October.

Haggling for Health Care
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | July 2, 2013 | Naomi Freundlich
I’m not a big fan of bargaining and my half-hearted attempts to get a better price for a used car, garage sale find or contractor’s service have been mostly unsuccessful. There’s always that nagging feeling that the seller is laughing with delight once I’m gone, thinking, “I really pulled one over on that rube!” And so it has come as somewhat of a shock to me that medical care has become the new garage sale, as far as haggling goes.

Who Wins or Loses from the Delay in the Employer Health Insurance Mandate?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | July 10, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman
It’s hard to say it was a surprise last week that the Obama administration delayed implementation of the employer mandate — that pillar of health reform requiring employers with more than 50 employees to provide health insurance or else pay a fine.

Can You Choose Your Doctor? Well, Yes and No
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | July 23, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman
The specter of loss of choice and freedom to select the doctor you want haunts again. This time it’s being raised on the airwaves with an ad from Americans for Prosperity…

Cancer Survivors Not Receiving Preventive Care
HBNS STORY | August 6, 2013
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that some cancer survivors do not always have the best access to primary care and that the type of health insurance they have—or don’t have—may be a factor.

Googling for Doctors and Health Information
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | August 6, 2013 | Conversation Continues
Many people rely on the internet to look up health information or find a new doctor. However, navigating through the vast amount of resources and information online can be exhausting. Doctors Kevin Pho and Kenny Lin share some tips.

Who’s Left Out of Obamacare?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | August 14, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman
The main purpose of health reform, the president said at his press conference last Friday, was to provide health insurance to people at affordable rates…Whether that coverage will be affordable or comprehensive for families remains to be seen.

The Meaning of Another Obamacare Delay
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | August 21, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman
The media has discovered another delay in another provision of Obamacare, and the new delay affects consumers’ pocketbooks directly...

Political Football Season Starts for Medicare
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | August 28, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman
It’s the silly season again for Medicare. It comes around whenever a political campaign is about to begin as it is for next year’s mid-term elections….Politicians love to play ball with benefits for seniors.

The Consumer's Ongoing Dilemma: Making Sense of Hospital Prices
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | September 10, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman
Hospital charges are essentially like car sticker prices. Insurers use them as a starting point to negotiate what they actually will pay providers on their policyholders' behalf.

Long-Term Care and Long-Term Care Insurance
PREPARED PATIENT RESOURCE | Plan for Your End-of-Life Care
Learn about long-term care and whether you need long-term care insurance.

Handling an Insurance Dispute
PREPARED PATIENT RESOURCE | Pay for Your Health Care
What to do if your health insurance denies you coverage for a procedure.

Low Premiums, Narrow Networks and the Ideal of Consumer Choice
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | September 18, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman
We want to have choices about the health care we get and who provides it. Many of us think we have that now...

Paying for Prescription Medications
PREPARED PATIENT RESOURCE | Pay for Your Health Care
Prescription drugs can be expensive. Here’s how to get help paying for them and finding lower cost options.

How Much Will Your Health Care Cost?
PREPARED PATIENT RESOURCE | Pay for Your Health Care
It can be hard to figure out how much your health care will cost ahead of time. Here are some tips for preparing for the cost of your procedures.

What Are Medicare and Medicaid?
PREPARED PATIENT RESOURCE | Pay for Your Health Care
Learn more about the U.S. government’s health insurance programs for older adults and people with low-incomes and resources.

Health Insurance: Glossary of Common Terms
PREPARED PATIENT RESOURCE | Pay for Your Health Care
Don’t know a deductible from a premium? Here’s a helpful guide to health insurance terms.

Getting Health Insurance
PREPARED PATIENT RESOURCE | Pay for Your Health Care
Don’t have health insurance? Here’s advice on how to find the right insurance for your needs.

Choosing an Exchange Policy: What's the Rush?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | October 2, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman
Will all the White House messages, the stream of breathless Twitter updates on the number of hits and enrollments, and the press hype surrounding opening day send the uninsured public into panic mode?

The Latest on the Usefulness of Hospital Ratings
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | October 30, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman
On Monday, Charlie Ornstein of Pro Publica provided the latest word on the usefulness of hospital ratings, an issue that seems never to disappear despite the growing body of work that raises questions about the methodology used to create them, their conflicts of interest with sponsors, and most importantly, their usefulness to the public.

The Great Canadian Experiment to House the Homeless
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | November 13, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman
At Home/Chez Soi, a Canadian program for the mentally ill, is built on the concept that providing housing is the first order of business. An approach that reinforces the truism that good health is more than swallowing the latest wonder drug.

Where, Oh Where Are Those Insurance Summaries for Consumers?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | December 3, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman
Buying health insurance through the state shopping exchanges was supposed to be a breeze — like buying an airline ticket from Travelocity. But it isn’t, and the reason why has nothing to do with the technical glitches of HealthCare.gov...

Immigration Status Impacts Health, Especially for the Young
HBNS STORY | December 10, 2013
Age at immigration and citizenship status may have health implications for immigrants, finds a new study in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Massachusetts Residents Healthier After Health Care Reform
HBNS STORY | December 12, 2013
Residents of Massachusetts saw small gains in health status following the enactment of a state-wide health insurance mandate in 2006, finds a new study in the Milbank Quarterly.

What I Expect From the Medicare Program
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | December 16, 2013 | Jeff Goldsmith
After half a lifetime of following the Medicare program, on October 1, 2013, I became a Medicare beneficiary. I'm part of the leading edge of baby boomers joining the program, ten thousand a day. Here are some reflections upon joining...

Is Shopping for an Exchange Policy an Impossible Task?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | December 18, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman
Last week at a New York City meeting of the Association of Health Care Journalists, Elisabeth Benjamin, a vice president of the Community Service Society, tried to explain the New York health insurance exchange to a group of skeptical journalists who had more than a passing familiarity with the topic...

Admitted for “Observation”? Watch Out for Big Medical Bills
HBNS STORY | December 19, 2013
Patients who are placed in observation instead of being admitted to a hospital may face high out-of-pocket costs for treatment, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Advice for People New to Health Insurance (Part 1): Getting Covered
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | December 23, 2013 | CFAH Staff
In part one of our series, we look at the basics of picking a health insurance plan that's right for you, your family or a loved one. Our 'Be a Prepared Patient' resources can help you find the best coverage at the best price for your health needs...

Advice for People New to Health Insurance (Part 2): Medicare and Medicaid Explained
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | December 24, 2013 | CFAH Staff
In part two of our series, we look at the difference between Medicare and Medicaid. Our 'Be a Prepared Patient' resources can help you figure out if you qualify for either of these or other special health care programs...

Advice for People New to Health Insurance (Part 3): Understanding Insurance Terms
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | December 25, 2013 | CFAH Staff
In part three of our series, we look at insurance terms that are used most often to describe or explain how much you’ll pay and what your benefits are. Our 'Be a Prepared Patient' resources clarify these common phrases...

Advice for People New to Health Insurance (Part 4): How Much Will Health Care Services Cost?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | December 26, 2013 | CFAH Staff
In part four of our series, we look at a few ways to estimate the cost of your care ahead of time so you can make the best choice for you and your loved ones. Our 'Be a Prepared Patient' resources offer trusted websites and tips to get started...

More Funding for Community Health Centers Improves Access to Care
HBNS STORY | January 2, 2014
Increased federal funding for community health centers has helped low-income adults get access to primary and dental care, according to a new study in Health Services Research.

Hospitals Serving Elderly Poor More Likely to Be Penalized for Readmissions
HBNS STORY | January 7, 2014
Hospitals that treat more poor seniors who are on both Medicaid and Medicare tend to have higher rates of readmissions, triggering costly penalties, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Lack of Access Still to Blame
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | January 7, 2014 | CFAH Staff
What's the key to reducing costly emergency room visits and readmissions? People who lack convenient access to a health care provider, with or without insurance, return to the emergency department or hospital out of need and desperation...

Why Does Our Health Care Cost So Much?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | January 8, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
We know that the U.S. has the most expensive health care in the world. But beyond noting that dubious achievement, we seldom ask why...

Finding the Price of Health Care Services Remains Elusive
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | January 9, 2014 | CFAH Staff
It's unfair to advise people to find out the price of a treatment when the price-transparency deck is stacked against them. So who will help patients find reliable price information and (hopefully) bring down the cost of care?

Tiered Insurance Networks: Complicating Obamacare or Controlling Costs?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | January 21, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
Last fall, a Pennsylvania woman, frustrated by the snags and snafus of healthcare.gov, turned to the website of Independence Blue Cross, the biggest insurance carrier in Southeastern Pennsylvania, to make sense of her health insurance choices...

Do Patients Care How Much Money Their Doctors Make?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | January 28, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
I am all for transparency when it comes to health care. So when Medicare announced a few weeks ago that it would begin to tell the public how much doctors are paid to treat Medicare patients, my first thought was "hooray." Still, I keep returning to the question: What will the data do for the average person?...

N=1: My Experience With Cost, Care and Insurance
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | February 3, 2014 | Robert Fogerty
During my senior year in college, with medical school acceptance letter in hand, I was diagnosed with metastatic testicular cancer. Early in my treatment I received a letter that my health insurance had been exhausted and I would no longer receive any health benefits. Needless to say, this was a problem...

Why Low-Income Seniors Fail to Get Help Paying for Health Care
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | February 11, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
A couple weeks ago, the Medicare Rights Center, a well-known New York-based advocacy group, released a report card showing that seniors on Medicare are struggling to pay for their health care. This finding brings up an important question: Why aren't seniors using the variety of state and federal programs that have been set up to help people in this situation?

Backlash Against Narrow Provider Networks Begins
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | February 18, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
Seniors are starting to realize that fewer doctors and hospitals may be available to them if they select a Medicare Advantage plan. Restricting these choices – in theory – is a way to control the price of health care. There's just one problem: Consumers still want to choose their doctors or stick with the ones they've got...

'Me' Versus 'We' in Obamacare
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | February 25, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
The Obama administration and Affordable Care Act supporters have not bothered to explain how the law includes cross-subsidization, missing an opportunity to talk about the "we" aspects of the law. As one 58-year-old woman put it: "The chances of me having a child at this age is zero. Why do I have to pay an additional $5,000 a year for coverage that I will never, ever need?" Here's how it works...

Obamacare Websites: Not Just a .Gov Problem
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | March 4, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
Shoppers searching the Internet for health insurance coverage can be forgiven if they are confused.

Better Benefits Help Medicaid Recipients Quit Smoking
HBNS STORY | March 6, 2014
Expanded smoking cessation benefits offered under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) should give more people the opportunity to quit, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Patients Are Loyal to Their Doctors, Despite Performance Scores
HBNS STORY | March 11, 2014
Patients with an existing relationship with a doctor ranked as lower performing were no more likely to switch doctors than patients with higher performing doctors, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Look Who's Coming Between You and Your Doctor
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | March 11, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
Opponents of health care reform, especially those who resist moving to a single payer system like Canada’s, have often used a very powerful argument to sway public opinion. Any significant changes, they warn, to America's private insurance system would mean that the government will come between patients and their doctors by making decisions about the care Americans receive. But what if it's not the government that is inserting itself between you and your doctor?

Cost of Health Care a Burden for Most U.S. Households
HBNS STORY | March 13, 2014
Since 2001, health care costs have become more burdensome for almost all Americans, at every income level and in every geographic area, finds a new study published in The Milbank Quarterly.

The Dilemma of Canceled Insurance Policies
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | March 18, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
By now it's hardly a secret that insurance companies have canceled the policies of millions of Americans whose old coverage did not comply with new benefit requirements of the Affordable Care Act. But after hearing all the backlash and requiring people to buy newer and, in the eyes of ACA supporters, better policies, the administration took another U-turn and changed the rules once again...

Costs Complicated Dad's Cancer Care
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | March 31, 2014 | Laura Sander
"I walked in a person, and out a cancer patient," my dad said as we filed home. Crossing this threshold, we found ourselves on the other side of medicine – the side on the exam table or gurney, as opposed to the one standing over it. In time, it became clear we were running out of money...

The Medicaid Gap Hits Home
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | April 8, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
A few days before the recent deadline for Obamacare sign-ups, I visited with one of the exchange navigators in Colorado, a state that expanded its Medicaid program and is working hard to enroll uninsured residents. This visit got me thinking of the millions of other people who live in states where they can't get access to Obamacare because they are too poor and yet are also not eligible for Medicaid...

Community Demographics Linked to Hospital Readmissions
HBNS STORY | April 10, 2014
Nearly 60 percent of the variation in hospital readmission rates appears to be associated with a hospital’s geographic location, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Co-Insurance for Medications: A Troubling Trend for Consumers
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | April 14, 2014 | Ali Khoshnevis
As the health care system changes in the coming years, one particular trend that will negatively impact consumers' out-of-pocket costs is the use of co-insurance (instead of a co-pay) for expensive specialty medications. Approximately 57 million Americans rely on these drugs to maintain their health, and it is disheartening to learn that many people are suffering because their medications have become too expensive...

Insurance Status Affects Where Young Adults Seek Health Care
HBNS STORY | April 22, 2014
Perhaps due to a lack of or inconsistent insurance coverage, young adults age 18 to 25 tend to go to the doctor’s office less often than children or adolescents, yet have higher rates of emergency room use, finds a study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Insurers Reap Rewards of Medicare Advantage Plans
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | April 22, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
A couple weeks ago, the Obama administration handed sellers of Medicare Advantage plans an increase in government payments for next year. While this may seem like a good thing for the 16 million beneficiaries who have MA plans, it may not be good for Medicare as a whole.

Misunderstanding Health Insurance Leads Some to Overspend
HBNS STORY | May 1, 2014
Uninsured adults who didn't understand health insurance tended to have trouble selecting plans that aligned with their stated needs and spent more money, finds a study in Health Services Research.

Who Needs a Doctor These Days?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | May 6, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
Are insurance companies making more decisions about the health care you receive? I received a letter from Aetna, my Medicare supplement insurance carrier, advertising a pitch for getting "started on a healthier lifestyle." "Because of your health history, we think you might benefit from joining our program," the letter read. Annoyed, I called the insurer...

Pushing Back Against the High Price of Prescriptions
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | June 17, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
Are we finally doing something about the high prices of prescription drugs? Maybe. At the end of May, the Washington-based National Coalition on Health Care launched "Sustainable Rx Pricing," a campaign to "spark a national dialogue" about the high cost of drugs. Will it work?

Class and Insurance Stigma Are Barriers to Good Health Care
HBNS STORY | June 19, 2014
Some low-income, uninsured and Medicaid patients report feeling stigma when interacting with health care providers, finds a new report in The Milbank Quarterly.

Beware Those 'Average' Premium Increases – or Decreases!
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | June 24, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
Never before have I seen such intense interest from the press about health insurance rates, normally considered a snoozer of a story. For the public, this may be a good thing. If the stories are done well, consumers might learn something about the mix of factors that go into determining the premiums they will pay. But in the last couple of weeks, some stories have been downright misleading...

Little Progress Made in Reducing Health Disparities for People with Disabilities
HBNS STORY | June 26, 2014
Mental distress in people with disabilities is associated with increased prevalence of chronic illness and reduced access to health care and preventive care services, finds a new study in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved.

Seamless Health Insurance Coverage Still Illusory
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | June 30, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
For ages we've all known that the U.S. health insurance system works splendidly for those who have good employer-provided coverage, slide smoothly into Medicare when the time comes and seldom get sick. But evidence is beginning to trickle in that this seamless pathway for some people who've signed up for Obamacare insurance may be more illusory than real...

Stop the War on the Emergency Room (Fix the System Failure)
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | July 8, 2014 | Nick Dawson
The ED is convenient, it's open 24 hours, it does not require an appointment. So when the stomach bug or kitchen accident gets the best of you at 9:00 pm, and your doctor's office is closed, where are you going to go? And, yet, we still chide people – via reporting, casual comments and the communication of health systems – for using the ED for "non-emergent" needs. What I'd like to see is more hospitals flinging open the doors of their EDs and saying, "We'll take you, any time, for any reason, and you won't wait long or pay an arm and a leg"...

What's Wrong With Health Insurance Policies That Cover Less?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | July 9, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
Insurance companies and a group of senators headed by Alaska Democrat Mark Begich think they have a great idea for getting more young people to sign up for health insurance...

Ingenious Hospitals Find a New Way to Snag Patients
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | July 29, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
A mother takes her teenage son to an urgent care center that is part of her insurance plan's network. A clerk quickly refers him to the emergency room, across the street, which just happens to be part of the same hospital system as the urgent care center. Is this UCC sending some patients to its related hospital ER, clearly a place of high-priced care, to gin up revenue for the system's bottom line?...

Self-Reported Health Information Predicts High-Need Medicaid Patients
HBNS STORY | August 19, 2014
Just three types of simple self-reported health measures can predict which Medicaid-eligible adults are more likely to access intensive and costly health services over the next year, a new study in Health Services Research suggests.

What Health Insurers Told CFAH About Patient Engagement
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | August 20, 2014 | CFAH Staff
"Most health plans view engagement as important and want to support it. But they recognize that they are only one (relatively weak) factor in supporting patient/consumer engagement... Their customers want their insurance premiums going to medical care, not a bunch of mailings about things they already know they should do..." – Arthur Southam, MD – Executive Vice President of Health Plan Operations, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan, Oakland, CA

An Advantage for Medicare Patients or Just for Health Plans?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | August 20, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
That the government overpays sellers of Medicare Advantage plans is well known in Beltway circles, even if much of the public remains unaware…

Seniors Face Barriers to Critical Dental Care
HBNS STORY | August 26, 2014
Poor oral health can have a negative impact on seniors’ overall health and well-being, but for many, there are significant barriers to visiting a dentist, finds a new report in the American Journal of Health Behavior.

Consumer Choice Clashes With the Affordable Care Act
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | August 27, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
Recently the Department of Health and Human Services proposed that most of the federal health exchange policyholders be automatically re-enrolled next year in the same policy offered by the same company. That's right, no shopping around...

Another Strategy in the Health Care Reimbursement Game
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | September 17, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
American health care has become a gigantic game board with players of all sorts strategizing to win. Winning, of course, means getting more money from payers...

The Harm to Patients From Two-Tiered Generic Drugs
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | September 24, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
As we head into health insurance enrollment season, which opens in November, consumers/patients will face yet another challenge in selecting the best health plan...

Many Women Receive Unnecessary Pap Tests
HBNS STORY | September 30, 2014
As many as half to two-thirds of women who’ve undergone hysterectomies or are older than 65 years report receiving Pap tests for cervical cancer, despite recommendations against it, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Expanding Medicaid Increases Rural Health Care Access and Use
HBNS STORY | October 2, 2014
A new study in Health Services Research reveals that expanding Medicaid to cover more adults boosts health care access and use in rural populations.

Who Chooses the Medicines You Get – Your Doctor or Your Insurance Plan?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | October 8, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
A friend of mine suddenly learned the importance of patient engagement a few weeks ago when a matter affecting his pocketbook grabbed his attention. For the last several years the mantra has been "buy generics" as a way to lower the cost of drugs for consumers but also for the nation. For a while insurers did that. Not anymore...

Shopping for a Medicare Advantage Plan — Once Again!
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | October 15, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
I have just done something I said I would never do: shop for a Medicare Advantage plan to cover my gaps in Medicare. The usual flyers and brochures from sellers of Medicare Advantage plans began to arrive in the mail with their enticing sales pitches, and one nearly fooled me. Short of having a Medicare representative on the phone, you're stuck in an information swamp. No wonder studies show that beneficiaries are not eager to shop around even if they can get a new policy with a smaller monthly premium...

A Patient's Perspective on the High Cost of Cancer Drugs
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | October 21, 2014 | Andrew Schorr
Many cancer therapies now cost over $100,000 a year. Obviously, this expenditure is not sustainable for the majority of patients. At age 64, I am approaching Medicare coverage. Will I have the 20 percent co-pay to shoulder? As more people survive cancer and remain on ongoing medicines, the U.S. has to have a fair and open discussion about the cost of these medicines...

We Don't Ration Health Care in America. Or Do We?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | October 29, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
As narrower insurance networks begin to limit where we can get our care and contradict the American notion of abundant choices, I thought about the Canadian health care system and rumors of its long waiting lists that grab U.S. headlines. Yet, narrow insurance networks, sky-high deductibles, co-insurance and co-pays are ways of controlling our medical expenditures. Instead of rationing with waiting lists, America rations with price...

A Difficult Pill to Swallow
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | November 17, 2014 | Brandon Kopper
I am a pharmacy student and was recently sent home with a prescription to treat a very painful earache. I do not recall the name of the medication, but I do remember my reaction when I went to pick it up. I was shocked that the drug would cost me over two hundred dollars! I could not afford the medication, so I went home without it...

Taking Risks With Needed Drugs Due to High Cost
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | December 8, 2014 | Ginger Skinner
More than 44 percent of Americans regularly take a prescription drug. And according to the 2013 Consumer Reports Best Buy Drugs Prescription Drug Tracking Poll, 57 percent of people reported taking steps in the last year – some of them potentially dangerous – to curb high medication costs: not filling a prescription, skipping a scheduled dose, and taking an expired medication. Why? And what can be done to help?