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For a Less Biased Study, Try Randomization
HBNS STORY | April 12, 2011
If you’re interested in the finer points of medical research, this story’s for you.

Doctors, Nurses Often Use Holistic Medicine for Themselves
HBNS STORY | August 19, 2011
U.S. health care workers, especially doctors and nurses, use complementary and alternative medicine far more than do workers in other fields, according to a new study.

For Some Surgeries, More Is Better When Choosing Hospitals
HBNS STORY | September 1, 2011
Hospitals with higher surgical volumes for certain procedures are less likely to cause unintentional serious injuries to hospitalized patients when compared to those hospitals that perform the procedures less often.

Doctor-Patient Relationship Influences Patient Engagement
HBNS STORY | November 29, 2011
Patients who feel their physicians treat them with respect and fairness, communicate well and engage with them outside of the office setting are more active in their own health care, according to new study in Health Services Research.

Recommended Services Not Always Given During Patients’ Annual Exams
HBNS STORY | January 17, 2012
New research finds that patients may not always receive all of the screening tests and counseling services that are due during their medical checkups, according to a study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Primary Care Doctors Fail to Recognize Anxiety Disorders
HBNS STORY | February 21, 2012
Primary care providers fail to recognize anxiety disorders in two-thirds of patients with symptoms, reports a new study in General Hospital Psychiatry.

Employee Wellness Programs Provide Significant Savings Over Time
HBNS STORY | March 6, 2012
Employees who participated in a health-improvement program had fewer medical costs than non-participants, according to a new report in the American Journal of Health Promotion. In addition, three year employer savings outpaced the program costs with a return on investment of almost $3 to $1.

Hospitals Vary Widely in ICU Admissions
HBNS STORY | March 28, 2012
Hospitals vary widely in their admissions to intensive care units, which some experts believe are overused, costly and potentially dangerous. A new study in Health Services Research finds that the actions of hospitals - not the kinds of patients they attract - appear to be responsible for part of the difference in ICU use.

Use of Patient Centered Medical Home Features Not Related to Patients' Experience of Care
HBNS STORY | June 6, 2012
Providing patient care using key features of a Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH), a model of health care delivery promoted by major physician groups, may not influence what patients think about the care they receive, reports a new study in Health Services Research.

Supporting Front-Line Hospital Staff Leads to Safer and Happier Patients
HBNS STORY | June 21, 2012
Hospitals that use supportive management practices across diverse care providers and frontline staff are more likely to deliver quality patient care, according to a new study in Health Services Research.

More Nurses for Hospital Patients: Impact on Quality Questionable
HBNS STORY | September 12, 2012
Passage of a bill in 1999 requiring minimum nurse-to-patient ratios in California hospitals increased the number of nurses but resulted in mixed quality of care, according to a new study in the journal Health Services Research.

States that Support Access to Health Information Can Decrease Colon Cancer Deaths
HBNS STORY | September 25, 2012
Despite medical advances in colon cancer screening and treatment, people with a lower socioeconomic status remain at a higher risk of dying from colon cancer. A new study in The Milbank Quarterly finds that states and communities that focus on increasing the adoption of innovative health care practices along with providing greater access to public health information can reduce these deaths.

People Surprised by Costs of Out-of-Network Care
HBNS STORY | October 25, 2012
Forty percent of people who received health care outside of their insurance network did so out of necessity, finds a new study in Health Services Research. About half of those patients did not know how much they would have to pay for their out-of-network care.

Retail Clinics Impact Continuous Primary Care
HBNS STORY | November 15, 2012
Using retail walk-in health clinics, often located inside pharmacies or big-box stores, for simple acute care problems can interfere with establishing and maintaining a relationship with a primary care provider, find a new study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Patients with ICU Delirium More Likely to Die
HBNS STORY | December 6, 2012
Delirium, a condition developed by many patients in hospital intensive care units (ICU), is associated with higher mortality rates, more complications, longer stays in the ICU, and longer hospitalizations, finds a new meta-analysis in General Hospital Psychiatry.

Most People with Hepatitis C Go Untreated, Despite Effective Drugs
HBNS STORY | December 10, 2012
Just 20 percent of people infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) begin the recommended treatment regimen and less than 5 percent go on to successfully overcome the virus, according to a new review in General Hospital Psychiatry. Untreated substance abuse and depression are among the barriers to care.

Printed Reminders for Doctors Improve Health Care
HBNS STORY | December 12, 2012
Printed reminders about screening tests, vaccinations and other health topics can help doctors provide care that more closely reflects current medical guidelines and evidence-based medicine, finds a new review from The Cochrane Library.

Education Can Reduce Use of Antipsychotic Drugs in Nursing Home Patients
HBNS STORY | December 13, 2012
A new review in The Cochrane Library finds that education and social support for staff and caregivers can reduce the use of antipsychotic drugs in nursing home patients with dementia.

Health Care Providers Can Learn to Communicate Better with Patients
HBNS STORY | December 18, 2012
Medical students, doctors and nurses can be taught to use a more holistic, patient-centered approach during medical consultations, focusing on the person and not just their medical complaint, finds a new review in The Cochrane Library.

Adults with Disabilities More Likely to Seek Care in the Emergency Department
HBNS STORY | December 21, 2012
People with disabilities, while making up just 17 percent of the working-age adult population, account for almost 40 percent of all emergency department (ED) visits, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Pharmacists Can Improve Patient Outcomes
HBNS STORY | February 28, 2013
In addition to dispensing, packaging or compounding medication, pharmacists can help improve patient outcomes in middle-income countries by offering targeted education, according to a new review in The Cochrane Library.

Screening Decisions Are Better Informed When Risk Information Is Personalized
HBNS STORY | February 28, 2013
Patients’ ability to make genuinely informed choices about undergoing disease screening increases when the risk information that they receive is related to their own personal risk, rather than average risks, according to the results of a Cochrane systematic review.

Reduce Use of Antipsychotic Drugs in Elderly with Dementia
HBNS STORY | March 28, 2013
Most older adults with dementia can successfully be taken off antipsychotic medications, which have negative side effects and increase the risk of death, finds a new evidence review from The Cochrane Library.

Teaching Patients about New Medications? A Picture Is Worth 1000 Words
HBNS STORY | April 30, 2013
Improving people’s knowledge and skills about their medications may be best achieved with multimedia patient education materials, finds a new systematic review in The Cochrane Library.

Targeting Prescribers Can Reduce Excessive Use of Antibiotics in Hospitals
HBNS STORY | April 30, 2013
Giving prescribers access to education and advice or imposing restrictions on use can curb overuse or inappropriate use of antibiotics in hospitals, according to a new Cochrane systematic review.

Electronic Health Record Adoption Uneven Across U.S.
HBNS STORY | June 27, 2013
A new study in Health Services Research finds wide geographic variation in the adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) by ambulatory health care sites.

Electronic Health Records Can Measure Patient-Centered Care
HBNS STORY | November 21, 2013
Electronic health records collect non-clinical information that can be used to measure a medical practice’s patient-centeredness, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Many Patients Have Trouble ID’ing Their Medications
HBNS STORY | December 3, 2013
People who identified their medication by shape, size or color instead of name had poorer adherence and an increased risk of hospitalization, finds a recent study in the Journal of Health Communication: International Perspectives.

Doctors Unaware That More Teens Are Turning to E-Cigarettes
HBNS STORY | December 10, 2013
Many clinicians are unfamiliar with or uncomfortable with addressing the use of e-cigarettes with their young patients, finds a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Immigration Status Impacts Health, Especially for the Young
HBNS STORY | December 10, 2013
Age at immigration and citizenship status may have health implications for immigrants, finds a new study in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Massachusetts Residents Healthier After Health Care Reform
HBNS STORY | December 12, 2013
Residents of Massachusetts saw small gains in health status following the enactment of a state-wide health insurance mandate in 2006, finds a new study in the Milbank Quarterly.

Admitted for “Observation”? Watch Out for Big Medical Bills
HBNS STORY | December 19, 2013
Patients who are placed in observation instead of being admitted to a hospital may face high out-of-pocket costs for treatment, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Pharmacy Staff Frequently Misinform Teens Seeking Emergency Contraception
HBNS STORY | December 19, 2013
A new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health finds that pharmacy staff frequently give teens misleading or incorrect information about emergency contraception that may prevent them from getting the medication.

Doctors Experienced with Using EHRs Say They Add Value for Patients
HBNS STORY | January 2, 2014
A majority of surveyed physicians said they were alerted to a potential medication error or critical lab value by an electronic health record, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

More Funding for Community Health Centers Improves Access to Care
HBNS STORY | January 2, 2014
Increased federal funding for community health centers has helped low-income adults get access to primary and dental care, according to a new study in Health Services Research.

Hospitals Serving Elderly Poor More Likely to Be Penalized for Readmissions
HBNS STORY | January 7, 2014
Hospitals that treat more poor seniors who are on both Medicaid and Medicare tend to have higher rates of readmissions, triggering costly penalties, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Antibacterial Agent Boosts Toothpaste Effectiveness
HBNS STORY | January 9, 2014
Regular use of fluoride toothpaste containing triclosan, an antibacterial agent, reduces plaque, gingivitis and slightly reduces tooth decay compared to regular fluoride toothpaste, finds a new review in The Cochrane Library.

Gap in Life Expectancy Between Rural and Urban Residents Is Growing
HBNS STORY | January 23, 2014
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that rural residents have experienced smaller gains in life expectancy than their urban counterparts and the gap continues to grow.

Hospitalization Increases Risk of Depression and Dementia for Seniors
HBNS STORY | February 27, 2014
People over age 65 who have been hospitalized are at significantly greater risk for dementia or depression, finds a new study in General Hospital Psychiatry.

Better Benefits Help Medicaid Recipients Quit Smoking
HBNS STORY | March 6, 2014
Expanded smoking cessation benefits offered under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) should give more people the opportunity to quit, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Patients Are Loyal to Their Doctors, Despite Performance Scores
HBNS STORY | March 11, 2014
Patients with an existing relationship with a doctor ranked as lower performing were no more likely to switch doctors than patients with higher performing doctors, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Cost of Health Care a Burden for Most U.S. Households
HBNS STORY | March 13, 2014
Since 2001, health care costs have become more burdensome for almost all Americans, at every income level and in every geographic area, finds a new study published in The Milbank Quarterly.

Online Ratings Don't Help Patients Compare Hospitals
HBNS STORY | March 18, 2014
Despite having access to online ratings, patients can’t distinguish the quality or performance of one hospital from another, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

A Phone Call from a Pharmacist Can Reduce Some Hospital Admissions
HBNS STORY | April 10, 2014
Pharmacist-patient telephone consultations appear to reduce hospitalizations in patients who are least at risk, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Community Demographics Linked to Hospital Readmissions
HBNS STORY | April 10, 2014
Nearly 60 percent of the variation in hospital readmission rates appears to be associated with a hospital’s geographic location, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Insurance Status Affects Where Young Adults Seek Health Care
HBNS STORY | April 22, 2014
Perhaps due to a lack of or inconsistent insurance coverage, young adults age 18 to 25 tend to go to the doctor’s office less often than children or adolescents, yet have higher rates of emergency room use, finds a study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Public Health Centers Deliver Equal or Better Quality of Care
HBNS STORY | April 28, 2014
A new study in Health Services Research reports that patients who get care at federally funded health centers have fewer office visits and hospitalizations, and receive similar or a better quality of preventive care when compared to similar patients of non-health center primary care providers.

Minorities Face Disparities in Treatment and Outcomes of Atrial Fibrillation
HBNS STORY | April 29, 2014
Minority patients with atrial fibrillation, a heart condition that increases the risk of stroke, were less likely to receive common treatments and more likely to die from the condition than their white counterparts, finds a new study in Ethnicity and Disease.

Misunderstanding Health Insurance Leads Some to Overspend
HBNS STORY | May 1, 2014
Uninsured adults who didn't understand health insurance tended to have trouble selecting plans that aligned with their stated needs and spent more money, finds a study in Health Services Research.

More Patient Education, Not Physician Training, Helps Control Diabetes
HBNS STORY | May 8, 2014
Teaching people with diabetes how to control their blood glucose levels, not their doctors, helps them achieve better results, finds a new study in Ethnicity and Disease.

Shared Decision Making Missing in Cancer Screening Discussions
HBNS STORY | June 12, 2014
A national survey of patients reveals that physicians don’t always fully discuss the risks and benefits of cancer screening, reports a new study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Class and Insurance Stigma Are Barriers to Good Health Care
HBNS STORY | June 19, 2014
Some low-income, uninsured and Medicaid patients report feeling stigma when interacting with health care providers, finds a new report in The Milbank Quarterly.

Little Progress Made in Reducing Health Disparities for People with Disabilities
HBNS STORY | June 26, 2014
Mental distress in people with disabilities is associated with increased prevalence of chronic illness and reduced access to health care and preventive care services, finds a new study in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved.

Early Palliative Care Cuts Costs for Critically Ill Patients
HBNS STORY | July 10, 2014
Palliative care delivered early during hospitalization can help cut costs for critically ill patients, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Inadequate Mental Health Care for Blacks with Depression and Diabetes, High Blood Pressure
HBNS STORY | July 24, 2014
A new study in General Hospital Psychiatry confirms that Blacks with depression plus another chronic medical condition, such as Type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure, do not receive adequate mental health treatment.

Patient-Centered Medical Homes Reduce Costs
HBNS STORY | July 31, 2014
As the number of patient centered medical homes has increased, a new report in the journal Health Services Research finds the model offers a promising option to reduce health care costs and utilization of some health care services.

Medicare Changes Lower Hospital Use
HBNS STORY | August 5, 2014
A recent study in Health Services Research based on 15 years of hospital data suggests that cuts in Medicare prices under the Affordable Care Act may slow the growth in overall hospital spending.

Mental Health Screening in Primary Care Helps Veterans
HBNS STORY | August 12, 2014
Veterans who receive mental health screening during primary care visits are generally getting adequate follow-up treatment, but the process for acquiring care could be improved, finds a new study in General Hospital Psychiatry.

Self-Reported Health Information Predicts High-Need Medicaid Patients
HBNS STORY | August 19, 2014
Just three types of simple self-reported health measures can predict which Medicaid-eligible adults are more likely to access intensive and costly health services over the next year, a new study in Health Services Research suggests.

Leaving Their Pediatricians Tough for Some Teens with Chronic Conditions
HBNS STORY | August 21, 2014
A new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health has found that one in five young adults with chronic illnesses said the transfer of their care from pediatrics to adult-oriented health care was unsatisfactory.

Seniors Face Barriers to Critical Dental Care
HBNS STORY | August 26, 2014
Poor oral health can have a negative impact on seniors’ overall health and well-being, but for many, there are significant barriers to visiting a dentist, finds a new report in the American Journal of Health Behavior.

Online Social Networking Linked to Use of Web for Health Info
HBNS STORY | September 16, 2014
The use of social networking sites like Facebook may have implications for accessing online health information, finds a new longitudinal study from the Journal of Health Communication.

Pressure from Providers Leads Some Women to Have C-Sections, Inductions
HBNS STORY | September 23, 2014
Pregnant women who felt pressured to have a labor induction or cesarean section by their obstetrical care providers were significantly more likely to have these procedures, even if there was no medical need for them, suggests a new study in Health Services Research.

Many Women Receive Unnecessary Pap Tests
HBNS STORY | September 30, 2014
As many as half to two-thirds of women who’ve undergone hysterectomies or are older than 65 years report receiving Pap tests for cervical cancer, despite recommendations against it, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Expanding Medicaid Increases Rural Health Care Access and Use
HBNS STORY | October 2, 2014
A new study in Health Services Research reveals that expanding Medicaid to cover more adults boosts health care access and use in rural populations.

Timing of Epidural Is Up to the Mother
HBNS STORY | October 9, 2014
When a woman is in labor, the appropriate time to give an epidural during childbirth is when she asks for it, suggests a new review in The Cochrane Library.

Fecal Blood Test May Save More Lives Than Colonoscopy
HBNS STORY | October 21, 2014
Colorectal cancer, or CRC, is the second-leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. State public health programs could screen nearly eight times as many individuals and prevent nearly twice as many CRC cases by using fecal immunochemical testing, or FIT, instead of colonoscopies, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Health Care Shortfalls for LGBT Young Women
HBNS STORY | October 28, 2014
Young sexual minority women, including those identifying as lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT), were found to have higher elevated odds of adverse health conditions than heterosexual young women. They also have lower odds of receiving a physical or dental examination, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Coordination Eases the Transition From Pediatric to Adult Health Care
HBNS STORY | November 4, 2014
New research in the Journal of Adolescent Health finds that when a young person moves from pediatric care to an adult practice, the transition is eased and better care is provided when formal processes are in place for the handoff.

Poor-Quality Weight Loss Advice Often Appears First in an Online Search
HBNS STORY | November 13, 2014
More than 40 percent of U.S. Internet users use online search engines to seek guidance on weight loss and physical activity. A new study in the American Journal of Public Health finds that high-quality weight loss information often appears after the first page of search engine results.

Chronic Care Coordinators Improve Diabetes Monitoring But Not Blood Sugar Control
HBNS STORY | November 11, 2014
Getting support from a chronic care coordinator increases blood-glucose testing and foot and eye exams in people with type 2 diabetes, but it may not improve blood-sugar control, a new study in the journal Health Services Research indicates.

Some Psychiatric Patients Are More Frequent Users of Hospital ERs
HBNS STORY | November 13, 2014
New research in General Hospital Psychiatry finds that homelessness, cocaine use, being on Medicare, having a personality disorder or having liver disease appears to be a predictor of frequent ED use by people with a psychiatric illness.

Medicaid Payments for Office Visits Impact Cancer Screening Rates
HBNS STORY | November 20, 2014
New research in the journal Cancer finds that Medicaid recipients are more likely to undergo cancer screening tests when their doctors receive higher reimbursements for routine office visits rather than for the tests themselves.

Depression and Dementia in Older Adults Increase Risk of Preventable Hospitalizations
HBNS STORY | November 20, 2014
Older adults with mental health conditions, such as depression or cognitive impairment, have a higher risk of readmission within 30 days after a hospital stay for pneumonia, heart attack or congestive heart failure, according to a new study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Military Culture Enables Tobacco Use
HBNS STORY | December 4, 2014
A new study in the American Journal of Health Promotion finds that U.S. military culture perpetuates the notion that using tobacco provides stress relief. Previous studies of tobacco use for stress relief among soldiers have produced no evidence supporting the theory.