HEALTH BEHAVIOR NEWS SERVICE

Content tagged with 'Minority Health and Health Disparities' | back to all topics
Child tags: African-American Health   Asian Health   Health Disparities   Latino and Hispanic Health  

Sort by: Show All | HBNS Articles only | Blog Posts only | Resources Only | Features Only
Order by: Newest First | Oldest First

Physician Behaviors May Contribute to Disparities in Mental Health Care
HBNS STORY | December 3, 2014
The way medical doctors initially assess, treat and refer racial and ethnic minority patients may contribute to known disparities in their use of mental health services, according to a new study in Health Services Research.

The Canadian Doctor Who Prescribes Income to Treat Poverty
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | November 19, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
The first blog post I wrote about a Canadian doctor who was "diagnosing poverty" received more than 3,000 hits. I wanted to circle back to see whether or not the program had taken root. Indeed it has. "It's been a wildfire effect," Dr. Gary Bloch told me. Why can't the U.S. follow suit?...

Some Psychiatric Patients Are More Frequent Users of Hospital ERs
HBNS STORY | November 13, 2014
New research in General Hospital Psychiatry finds that homelessness, cocaine use, being on Medicare, having a personality disorder or having liver disease appears to be a predictor of frequent ED use by people with a psychiatric illness.

Health Care Shortfalls for LGBT Young Women
HBNS STORY | October 28, 2014
Young sexual minority women, including those identifying as lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT), were found to have higher elevated odds of adverse health conditions than heterosexual young women. They also have lower odds of receiving a physical or dental examination, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Nearly Half of Older Americans Need Support With Daily Routines
HBNS STORY | October 23, 2014
About 18 million Americans age 65 and older require help with routine daily activities like bathing, handling medications or meals, finds a new study in Milbank Quarterly. The research shows a growing need for improved services and support for older Americans, their spouses, their children and other "informal caregivers."

Nationality at Birth Plays a Role in U.S. Adult Vaccination Rates
HBNS STORY | October 14, 2014
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that foreign-born adult U.S. residents, who make up about 13 percent of the population, receive vaccinations at significantly lower rates than U.S.-born adults. This gap in care puts them at greater risk of exposure to several vaccine-preventable diseases.

Only Half of U.S. Adults Over 45 Are Screened for Diabetes
HBNS STORY | September 25, 2014
A new cross-sectional study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that only half of adults in the U.S. were screened for diabetes within the last three years, less than what is recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA).

Online Social Networking Linked to Use of Web for Health Info
HBNS STORY | September 16, 2014
The use of social networking sites like Facebook may have implications for accessing online health information, finds a new longitudinal study from the Journal of Health Communication.

Stress Is US
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | September 8, 2014 | Jane Sarasohn Kahn
"Reality is the leading cause of stress among those in touch with it," Lily Tomlin once quipped. So it's no surprise, then, that one-half of the people in the U.S. have had a major stressful event or experience in the last year. And health tops the list...

Poor Health Habits Linked to Financial Insecurity
HBNS STORY | September 4, 2014
Financial hardship, or feeling that one can’t make ends meet, may be more predictive of health risk behaviors than actual income levels for people with low-incomes, finds a recent study in the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Sexual Risk Behaviors of Hispanic Youth Vary by Language, Place of Birth
HBNS STORY | September 2, 2014
A new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health finds that the sexual risk behaviors of young Hispanic people living in the U.S. vary considerably with their degree of acculturation.

Consumer Choice Clashes With the Affordable Care Act
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | August 27, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
Recently the Department of Health and Human Services proposed that most of the federal health exchange policyholders be automatically re-enrolled next year in the same policy offered by the same company. That's right, no shopping around...

Family History of Undertreatment May Discourage Blacks from Seeking Mental Health Care
HBNS STORY | August 7, 2014
Blacks with a family history of untreated mental health disorders are less likely to seek treatment, even when they rate their own mental health as poor, finds a new study in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Facing a Serious Diagnosis? 'AfterShock' Now an App
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | July 31, 2014 | CFAH Staff
Receiving bad health news can spark great upheaval. It is a time when nothing is certain and the future looks dark. The new, free app 'AfterShock: Facing a Serious Diagnosis' offers a basic roadmap through the first few days and weeks, providing concise information and trusted resources to help you regain a bit of control during this turbulent time...

Inadequate Mental Health Care for Blacks with Depression and Diabetes, High Blood Pressure
HBNS STORY | July 24, 2014
A new study in General Hospital Psychiatry confirms that Blacks with depression plus another chronic medical condition, such as Type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure, do not receive adequate mental health treatment.

When It Comes to Health Disparities, Place Matters More Than Race
HBNS STORY | July 17, 2014
Blacks and Whites living in an integrated, low-income urban area had similar rates of treatment and management of hypertension, or high blood pressure, finds a new study in Ethnicity & Disease.

Seamless Health Insurance Coverage Still Illusory
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | June 30, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
For ages we've all known that the U.S. health insurance system works splendidly for those who have good employer-provided coverage, slide smoothly into Medicare when the time comes and seldom get sick. But evidence is beginning to trickle in that this seamless pathway for some people who've signed up for Obamacare insurance may be more illusory than real...

Growing Up Poor Impacts Physical and Mental Health in Young Adults
HBNS STORY | June 24, 2014
Socioeconomic adversity during childhood increases the likelihood of both depression and higher body mass index (BMI) in early adolescence, which can worsen and lead to illness for young adults, according to a new report in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Life-Changing Events Can Lead to Less Physical Activity
HBNS STORY | June 5, 2014
Adults tend to engage in less leisure-time physical activity after changes in both lifestyle and physical status, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Entitlement: The Overlooked Dimension of Patient Engagement
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | June 4, 2014 | Jessie Gruman
What does it means to be an "engaged" patient in the VA system today? It seems you have to know a senator who will intervene on your behalf, to give your health care a priority higher than his other constituents. This is deeply discomforting, and I hate that I am treated in a health care system where even those who are most accountable for the quality of the care it provides (the institutional leaders) can't trust the institution or the professionals who work there to routinely and uniformly deliver excellent care...

Cancer Screening: Understanding 'Relative Risk'
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | June 3, 2014 | Kenny Lin
I have offered before a few reasons for eligible patients to consider not getting screened for lung cancer. I concede, however, that reasonable people might conclude that the potential harms are outweighed by the benefit of reducing one's risk of dying by one-fifth. The next critical question that needs to be asked is: one-fifth of what?

Caring for the Whole Patient
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | May 27, 2014 | Carolyn Thomas
When I was discharged from the intensive care unit in cardiology, not one of the nurses, residents or cardiologists asked if I'd be able to afford the fistful of expensive new cardiac meds I'd been prescribed. Not one asked if there was anybody at home to help take care of me there, or if there was anybody at home who needed me to take care of them. Not one asked if I'd be returning to a high-stress job, or even if I had enough banked sick time or vacation days to take sufficient time off. Such real-life issues are simply not the concern of most of our health care providers...

Many Smokers Still Surprised by Facts About Tobacco's Dangers
HBNS STORY | May 15, 2014
Between half and one-third of smokers presented with corrective statements about the dangers of smoking indicated that some of the information was new to them and motivated them to quit, finds a new study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

More Patient Education, Not Physician Training, Helps Control Diabetes
HBNS STORY | May 8, 2014
Teaching people with diabetes how to control their blood glucose levels, not their doctors, helps them achieve better results, finds a new study in Ethnicity and Disease.

Low Self-Rating of Social Status Predicts Heart Disease Risk
HBNS STORY | May 6, 2014
How a person defines their own socioeconomic standing (SES) within their community can help predict their risk of cardiovascular disease, but only among Whites, not Blacks, finds a recent study in Ethnicity and Disease.

Minorities Face Disparities in Treatment and Outcomes of Atrial Fibrillation
HBNS STORY | April 29, 2014
Minority patients with atrial fibrillation, a heart condition that increases the risk of stroke, were less likely to receive common treatments and more likely to die from the condition than their white counterparts, finds a new study in Ethnicity and Disease.

Blacks with Financial Worries Have Lower Health Scores
HBNS STORY | April 15, 2014
Black adults who reported feeling more financial strain also rated their health more poorly than those with less financial strain, finds a new study in the American Journal of Health Behavior.

The Medicaid Gap Hits Home
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | April 8, 2014 | Trudy Lieberman
A few days before the recent deadline for Obamacare sign-ups, I visited with one of the exchange navigators in Colorado, a state that expanded its Medicaid program and is working hard to enroll uninsured residents. This visit got me thinking of the millions of other people who live in states where they can't get access to Obamacare because they are too poor and yet are also not eligible for Medicaid...

Double Discrimination Impacts Physical and Mental Health
HBNS STORY | March 25, 2014
Racial and sexual minorities, women, and obese people may face more health risks because of their disproportionate exposure to discrimination, according to a new report in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

The Person Responsible for Your Health Is...
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | February 27, 2014 | CFAH Staff
Is it our job alone to look after our health? Or do employers, insurers, for-profit companies and the government also share some responsibility to keep us healthy? One person's nanny state is another's public health salvation. There is no shortage of examples of opposing perspectives...

Getting Help for Depression
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | February 20, 2014 | Be a Prepared Patient
Depression affects nearly one in ten Americans yet many people often go untreated. In fact, a recent study found that 70 percent of people surveyed with symptoms of depression received no treatment of any kind. Here's advice on how to get help...

Is Your Doctor Paying Attention?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | February 13, 2014 | Carolyn Thomas
The $800 bottle of meds in my bathroom cabinet is a powerfully expensive reminder of my (former) family physician's lapse in attention – and my own lapse in catching her error. She'd somehow accidentally doubled both the dosage and the number of times per day to take these meds. How is this even possible? Somebody is not paying attention...

Health Inequalities Seen in Gays and Lesbians
HBNS STORY | February 11, 2014
People who identify as homosexual have several health disparities relative to their heterosexual peers, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Men, Elderly, Minorities Not Getting Treated for Depression
HBNS STORY | February 6, 2014
Depression rates are increasing in the U.S. and under-treatment is widespread, especially among certain groups including men, the poor, the elderly and ethnic minorities, finds a new study in General Hospital Psychiatry.

Gap in Life Expectancy Between Rural and Urban Residents Is Growing
HBNS STORY | January 23, 2014
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that rural residents have experienced smaller gains in life expectancy than their urban counterparts and the gap continues to grow.

Advice for People New to Health Insurance (Part 8): Who's Who In Your Doctor's Office
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | January 2, 2014 | Be a Prepared Patient
In the eighth and final part of our series, we explain who the various people are in your doctor's office, from nurse practitioners to lab technicians. Knowing their different roles can make your visit go more smoothly...

Advice for People New to Health Insurance (Part 6): 10 Steps to Making a Doctor's Appointment
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | December 31, 2013 | Be a Prepared Patient
In part six of our series, you'll find out what key pieces of information you need to know about your new doctor's office. Keep it handy with your personal health records or household files...

Who’s Who in Your Doctor’s Office
PREPARED PATIENT RESOURCE | Communicate With Your Doctors
Medical offices have a lot of staff but one common goal—helping you, the patient. Here are some of the people you may meet during your doctor’s appointment.

Minorities and Poor More Likely to Suffer from Restless Sleep and Chronic Diseases
HBNS STORY | December 17, 2013
The poor and minorities tend to suffer from poor sleep and chronic disease more often, but sleep does not appear to be a root cause of disease disparity, finds a new study in Ethnicity & Disease.

Massachusetts Residents Healthier After Health Care Reform
HBNS STORY | December 12, 2013
Residents of Massachusetts saw small gains in health status following the enactment of a state-wide health insurance mandate in 2006, finds a new study in the Milbank Quarterly.

Immigration Status Impacts Health, Especially for the Young
HBNS STORY | December 10, 2013
Age at immigration and citizenship status may have health implications for immigrants, finds a new study in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Unique Barriers for African Americans With High Blood Pressure
HBNS STORY | November 26, 2013
African Americans with high blood pressure who reported experiencing racial discrimination had lower rates of adherence to their blood pressure medication, finds a new study in the American Journal of Public Health.

The Great Canadian Experiment to House the Homeless
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | November 13, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman
At Home/Chez Soi, a Canadian program for the mentally ill, is built on the concept that providing housing is the first order of business. An approach that reinforces the truism that good health is more than swallowing the latest wonder drug.

Race a Bigger Health Care Barrier Than Insurance Status
HBNS STORY | November 7, 2013
Blacks, Hispanics and Asians are less likely than non-Hispanic Whites to visit a health care professional, even with health insurance, finds a recent study in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved.

This Doctor Treats Poverty Like a Disease
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | November 6, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman
What would you think if your doctor handed you a prescription that recommended filing your tax returns or applying for food stamps instead of the usual medicines for high blood pressure or diabetes...

Lifestyle Behaviors Key to Post-Deployment Health of Veterans
HBNS STORY | October 31, 2013
A new study in the American Journal of Health Promotion finds that the lifestyle of veterans both pre- and post-deployment influences their post-deployment wellness.

Healthy Food Rarely Convenient for Urban Minorities
HBNS STORY | October 15, 2013
A survey of stores in a predominantly black, low income area of Philadelphia found that nearly 80 percent received low ratings for the availability of healthy food, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Latest Health Behavior News
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | July 26, 2013 | Health Behavior News Service
This week in health news: Men opt for PSA test, despite guidelines | Obesity an added burden for people with disabilities | Minorities not getting mental health care | Economic downturns affect preventive care

Blacks and Latinos Seek Mental Health Care Less Often
HBNS STORY | July 18, 2013
Blacks and Latinos receive less adequate mental health care than Whites, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Latest Health Behavior News
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | July 9, 2013 | Health Behavior News Service
This week in health news: Using shame to promote weight loss doesn’t work | Black nursing homes face challenges | Hispanic and Black children not getting the right asthma meds | Electronic health records not widespread

Hispanic and Black Kids Less Likely to Use Medication to Control Asthma
HBNS STORY | June 27, 2013
Black and Hispanic children with asthma are less likely than White children to use long-term asthma control medications, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Nursing Homes with More Black Residents Do Poorly
HBNS STORY | June 25, 2013
Nursing homes with higher proportions of Black residents do worse financially and deliver lower-quality care than nursing homes with few or no Black residents, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Latest Health Behavior News
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | May 22, 2013 | Health Behavior News Service
This week in health news: Trauma care disparities persist for blacks | Calorie info on menus starts to have an effect | Soda in schools may lead black students to drink more | “Eat Fresh”? Not necessarily

Breast Cancer Treatments Delayed for Black and Rural Women
HBNS STORY | May 21, 2013
Black women with breast cancer are more likely than Hispanic or white women to experience delays in the initiation of chemotherapy or radiation after surgery, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Latest Health Behavior News
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | April 25, 2013 | Health Behavior News Service
Brought to you by CFAH’s Health Behavior News Service: Depressed teens have rocky twenties | Gym benefits, yes. Extra costs, no thanks | Church goers look to ministry for health advice | Just say no to smoking in public housing

Latest Health Behavior News
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | March 7, 2013 | Health Behavior News Service
Recent health behavior research news stories: Friendships Are Good for Our Health | Obesity Lowers Quality of Life in Boys | Health Centers Have High Satisfaction Rates | Diabetes + Depression Increases Risk of Death

Despite Challenges, Health Centers Have High Satisfaction Rates
HBNS STORY | February 14, 2013
Low-income Americans are more likely to be satisfied with the care they receive at federally qualified health centers (FQHC) than at mainstream health care providers, reveals a new study in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved.

Does the U.S. Get Value for Its Health Care Dollars? – Part 2
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | February 13, 2013 | Trudy Lieberman
It turns out Japan has much to teach us about improving health…In many ways, Japan scores much higher than the U.S. when it comes to the health of its population.

Organize Your Health Care
PREPARED PATIENT RESOURCE | Organize Your Health Care

Adults with Disabilities More Likely to Seek Care in the Emergency Department
HBNS STORY | December 21, 2012
People with disabilities, while making up just 17 percent of the working-age adult population, account for almost 40 percent of all emergency department (ED) visits, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

Communicate With Your Doctors
PREPARED PATIENT RESOURCE | Communicate With Your Doctors
You and your doctor need accurate information from each other. Open communication with your doctor is one of the most important factors in getting and staying healthy.

Minorities More Likely to View Generic Drugs as Inferior
HBNS STORY | October 24, 2012
Negative perceptions about generic drugs are more widespread among ethnic minorities than among whites, finds a new study in Ethnicity & Disease.

Women and Minorities Face Barriers to Clinical Trials
HBNS STORY | June 1, 2012
Physicians have great influence over whether minorities and women participate in cancer clinical trials, according to a new literature review.

'Health Care Deserts' More Common In Black Neighborhoods
HBNS STORY | April 25, 2012
New research into "health care deserts" finds that primary-care physicians are especially hard to find in predominantly Black and/or low-income Hispanic metropolitan neighborhoods.

Bilingual Immigrants Report Better Health Than Speakers of One Language
HBNS STORY | February 29, 2012
A study in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior suggests that immigrants who learn English while maintaining their native language could also maintain strong mental and physical health.

Study Illuminates Ethnic Disparities in Diabetes and Cognitive Impairment
HBNS STORY | January 31, 2012
A new study finds that decreasing the disparities in rates of type 2 diabetes among Whites, Blacks and Hispanics could eliminate some racial and ethnic disparities in the development of cognitive impairment or dementia. Prior research has shown that type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for all forms of major cognitive impairment, including Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study in Ethnicity & Disease.

Mammogram Rates Lower for Mexican Women in U.S.
HBNS STORY | December 20, 2011
Mexican women in the United States are less likely to get mammograms than white women, black women and other Latinas, according to a new study in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

Racial Disparities in Colon Cancer Screening Persist Despite Insurance, Access
HBNS STORY | December 12, 2011
Public health researchers have long attributed the disparity in colonoscopy rates between whites and minorities to a lack of health insurance or access to doctors. Now, a new study in the journal Health Services Research suggests the reasons for the differences are more complex.

Doctors Often Overrate How Well They Speak a Second Language
HBNS STORY | October 27, 2011
New research shows that physicians who say they are fluent in a second language may be overestimating their actual skills.

Ethnic Differences in Appointment Keeping Affect Health of Diabetes Patients
HBNS STORY | October 27, 2011
Ethnic differences in appointment keeping may be an important factor in poor health outcomes among some minority patients with diabetes, according to a new study.

Black, Hispanic, Poor Young Women Less Likely to Complete HPV Vaccinations
HBNS STORY | August 30, 2011
Barriers that hinder young African-American, Hispanic and poor women from completing a series of three vaccinations to prevent human papillomavirus infection (HPV) also leave them at higher risk for cervical cancer and death.

Prejudice Linked to Depression, Anxiety in Gay and Bisexual Black Men
HBNS STORY | August 30, 2011
The harassment, discrimination and negative feelings about homosexuality that black gay and bisexual men often experience can contribute significantly to mental health disorders such as depression and anxiety, a small new study finds.

African-Americans With Thyroid Cancer Fare Worse Than Whites
HBNS STORY | June 21, 2011
African-Americans have fewer incidences of thyroid cancer but have a more advanced form of the disease once they receive a diagnosis — and are more likely to die from it, according to a new study.

Young Asian/Pacific Islander Women in Calif. Face Higher Breast Cancer Risk
HBNS STORY | June 21, 2011
Young Asian/Pacific Islander women born in California have higher risks of breast cancer than young white women, and some groups, including Filipinas, might have higher risks than African-Americans.

Treatment for Minority Stroke Patients Improves at Top-ranked Hospitals
HBNS STORY | June 21, 2011
A new study suggests there has been some improvement in reducing the gap in stroke hospitalization between white and minority patients.

Bisexual, Lesbian Women Less Likely to Get Pap Tests
HBNS STORY | June 7, 2011
A new study finds that young bisexual and lesbian women are less likely to get Pap tests than straight women, while young bisexual women face a higher risk of being diagnosed with sexually transmitted diseases.

Inner-City Health Centers Could Do More to Boost Breastfeeding
HBNS STORY | May 6, 2011
Health centers and birth hospitals serving largely minority populations could do more to promote and encourage recommended breastfeeding, according to a new study of Philadelphia safety-net health clinics.

Positive Media Campaigns Help Minorities Put Down Cigarettes
HBNS STORY | April 29, 2011
Media campaigns that offer positive encouragement can have an impact on getting African-Americans to quit, a new study finds.

Culture and Stigma Affect Mental Health Care for Latinos
HBNS STORY | March 22, 2011
Latinos benefit from antidepressants like everybody else — only they do not use them nearly as often. The trick is getting past some cultural barriers.

Minority Women Might Have Higher Depression Risk During Pregnancy
HBNS STORY | March 22, 2011
A new study finds that African-American and Asian/Pacific Islander women have double the risk that others do of becoming depressed before giving birth.

We Can Overcome Chronic Disease Disparities
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | March 17, 2011 | Chris Gibbons
According to American Medical News, the U.S. health system is demonstrating better performance on most measures of health care quality, but it's failing to improve access to care or cut racial and ethnic health disparities.

Death Rates Remain Higher for Poor Black Americans
HBNS STORY | February 24, 2011
In 2000, a black, working-aged resident of a poor neighborhood significantly was more likely to die than a white American — a situation that essentially remained unchanged from 20 years earlier.

Black and Hispanic Women With Breast Cancer Face Treatment Delays
HBNS STORY | February 1, 2011
At a time when access to prompt treatment might affect survival, a large new study finds that African-American and Hispanic women newly diagnosed with breast cancer often face delays in care of more than a month.

Multiple Sclerosis More Linked to Depression in Minorities
HBNS STORY | December 21, 2010
For many with multiple sclerosis, the disease wreaks havoc with emotional well being, and according to a new study, minorities might especially be at risk for developing depressive symptoms.

Now or Later
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | October 26, 2010 | Chris Gibbons
The October 19 edition of iHealthBeat is reporting that National Coordinator for Health IT David Blumenthal and HHS Deputy Assistant Secretary for Minority Health Garth Graham have asked health IT vendors for their help in preventing a "digital divide" involving health care providers who serve minority communities. Blumenthal and Graham called on these vendors to make sure they target such health care providers in their marketing and sales campaigns.

What Can Health Care Professionals Do About Poverty?
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | October 20, 2010 | Connie Davis
A colleague of mine, Cheryl, has been trying to help a solo physician address a thorny issue. Through the use of 'How's Your Health', an amazing Web-based suite of health and practice tools, the physician realized that many of her patients struggled with maintaining an adequate income. Cheryl went looking for some ideas for the physician, and she came across this: Health Providers Against Poverty, an Ontario-based group that has a toolkit to help primary care professionals address poverty issues.

Communication Complications
PREPARED PATIENT BLOG | October 1, 2010 | Chris Gibbons
A recently published study in the August issue of Archives of Internal Medicine reveals that there are significant gaps between what doctors think their patients know and what patients say they know. The findings are based on a survey of 89 patients and 43 physicians conducted between October 2008 and June 2009 at Waterbury Hospital affiliated with Yale School of Medicine. Researchers found that some of the discrepancies relate to basic information. For example, two-thirds of physicians thought patients knew their names. But only 18 percent of patients could correctly say their names.

Unequal Health Care Increases Colorectal Cancer Mortality in Blacks
HBNS STORY | August 19, 2010

Latinas Delay Seeking Care, Even if Insured and Ill
HBNS STORY | June 3, 2010

Blacks, Hispanics Less Likely Eligible for Medicare Prescription Help
HBNS STORY | May 20, 2010

Tainted Produce More Likely for Low-Income Shoppers
HBNS STORY | April 6, 2010

Latino and White Children Might Receive Different Pain Treatment
HBNS STORY | February 4, 2010