HEALTH BEHAVIOR NEWS SERVICE

CFAH's Health Behavior News Service covers the latest peer-reviewed studies and systematic reviews on the effects of behavior on health, health disparities and patient engagement research. Our goal is to present the facts for readers to understand and use to make informed choices about health and health care.

When It Comes to Health Disparities, Place Matters More Than Race
July 17, 2014
Blacks and Whites living in an integrated, low-income urban area had similar rates of treatment and management of hypertension, or high blood pressure, finds a new study in Ethnicity & Disease.
article image

Asthma Drugs Suppress Growth

July 17, 2014
Corticosteroid drugs that are given by inhalers to children with asthma may suppress their growth, suggests two evidence reviews published in The Cochrane Library.

article image

Cervical Cancer Prevention Program Saves Lives

July 15, 2014
A federal screening program markedly reduced death and illness from cervical cancer in underserved, low-income women but reached just 10 percent of the likely eligible population, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

article image

Early Palliative Care Cuts Costs for Critically Ill Patients

July 10, 2014
Palliative care delivered early during hospitalization can help cut costs for critically ill patients, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

article image

Neighborhoods with Healthy Food Options Less Likely to Have Overweight Kids

July 8, 2014
Children with a greater number of healthy food outlets near their homes had a reduced likelihood of being overweight or obese, finds an Australian study published in American Journal of Health Promotion.

article image

Mental Health Wins When Teens Play School Sports

July 1, 2014
Adolescents who play team sports in grades 8 through 12 have less stress and better mental health as young adults, finds new research published in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

article image

Little Progress Made in Reducing Health Disparities for People with Disabilities

June 26, 2014
Mental distress in people with disabilities is associated with increased prevalence of chronic illness and reduced access to health care and preventive care services, finds a new study in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved.

article image

Growing Up Poor Impacts Physical and Mental Health in Young Adults

June 24, 2014
Socioeconomic adversity during childhood increases the likelihood of both depression and higher body mass index (BMI) in early adolescence, which can worsen and lead to illness for young adults, according to a new report in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

article image

Class and Insurance Stigma Are Barriers to Good Health Care

June 19, 2014
Some low-income, uninsured and Medicaid patients report feeling stigma when interacting with health care providers, finds a new report in The Milbank Quarterly.

article image

Psychological Distress Affects Tobacco Use Differently for Men and Women

June 17, 2014
A new study in the American Journal of Health Behavior finds that women are more likely than men to use tobacco products after experiencing severe psychological distress.

article image

Shared Decision Making Missing in Cancer Screening Discussions

June 12, 2014
A national survey of patients reveals that physicians don’t always fully discuss the risks and benefits of cancer screening, reports a new study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

article image

Customized Text Messages Can Help Smokers Quit

June 10, 2014
Sending smokers individualized text messages was found to be twice as effective at helping them quit smoking than simply providing self-help materials, according to a new study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

article image

Life-Changing Events Can Lead to Less Physical Activity

June 5, 2014
Adults tend to engage in less leisure-time physical activity after changes in both lifestyle and physical status, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

More Health Behavior News

IN THE NEWS

Evidence behind today's health headlines

Diagnostic Confidence Key for Prompt Treatment for Women with Heart Symptoms

Doctors who believe that women have “atypical” coronary heart disease symptoms are less certain when diagnosing heart disease in women. As a result, women are less likely than men to receive treatments for an urgent cardiac event, finds a new study in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Related News: Emergency Docs More Likely To Miss Signs Of Stroke In The Young (Source: NPR)

SEARCH

ABOUT HBNS