HEALTH BEHAVIOR NEWS SERVICE

CFAH's Health Behavior News Service covers the latest peer-reviewed studies and systematic reviews on the effects of behavior on health, health disparities and patient engagement research. Our goal is to present the facts for readers to understand and use to make informed choices about health and health care.

Tobacco Use Varies Widely Among Asian and Pacific Islanders in U.S.
April 17, 2014
A new study in American Journal of Health Behavior finds significant differences in tobacco use when analyzed by specific Asian or Pacific Islander ethnicity.
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Blacks with Financial Worries Have Lower Health Scores

April 15, 2014
Black adults who reported feeling more financial strain also rated their health more poorly than those with less financial strain, finds a new study in the American Journal of Health Behavior.

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Community Demographics Linked to Hospital Readmissions

April 10, 2014
Nearly 60 percent of the variation in hospital readmission rates appears to be associated with a hospital’s geographic location, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

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A Phone Call from a Pharmacist Can Reduce Some Hospital Admissions

April 10, 2014
Pharmacist-patient telephone consultations appear to reduce hospitalizations in patients who are least at risk, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

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Weight Loss Efforts Start Well, but Lapse Over Time

April 8, 2014
Learning you have an obesity-related disease motivates many to start a weight loss program, but troubling health news is often not enough to sustain weight loss efforts, finds new research in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Many New Parents Unaware of Safety Guidelines

April 8, 2014
A new parent’s health literacy can affect their ability to follow recommendations to protect infants from injury, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Tobacco Promotions Still Reaching Youth

April 1, 2014
Teens and young adults who are exposed to marketing materials for tobacco products, such as coupons and websites, were far more likely to begin smoking or to be current smokers than those not exposed, finds a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Double Discrimination Impacts Physical and Mental Health

March 25, 2014
Racial and sexual minorities, women, and obese people may face more health risks because of their disproportionate exposure to discrimination, according to a new report in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

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Moves Take a Toll on Kids' Mental Health

March 20, 2014
Children in military families who relocate have an increased odds of suffering mental health problems, finds a large new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Online Ratings Don't Help Patients Compare Hospitals

March 18, 2014
Despite having access to online ratings, patients can’t distinguish the quality or performance of one hospital from another, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

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Cost of Health Care a Burden for Most U.S. Households

March 13, 2014
Since 2001, health care costs have become more burdensome for almost all Americans, at every income level and in every geographic area, finds a new study published in The Milbank Quarterly.

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Patients Are Loyal to Their Doctors, Despite Performance Scores

March 11, 2014
Patients with an existing relationship with a doctor ranked as lower performing were no more likely to switch doctors than patients with higher performing doctors, finds a new study in Health Services Research.

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Better Benefits Help Medicaid Recipients Quit Smoking

March 6, 2014
Expanded smoking cessation benefits offered under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) should give more people the opportunity to quit, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

More Health Behavior News

IN THE NEWS

Evidence behind today's health headlines

Diagnostic Confidence Key for Prompt Treatment for Women with Heart Symptoms

Doctors who believe that women have “atypical” coronary heart disease symptoms are less certain when diagnosing heart disease in women. As a result, women are less likely than men to receive treatments for an urgent cardiac event, finds a new study in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Related News: Emergency Docs More Likely To Miss Signs Of Stroke In The Young (Source: NPR)

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